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Herb and Salt Crusted Standing Rib Roast

 
One serving costs about $3.97 One serving costs about $3.97

$3.97 per serving

1 people like this recipe

1 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

4 valentine's day,dairy-free,dairy free
spoonacular Score:45%

Spoonacular Score: 45%

 

If you want to add more dairy free recipes to your recipe box, Herb and Salt Crusted Standing Rib Roast might be a recipe you should try. This recipe serves 4 and costs $3.97 per serving. One portion of this dish contains approximately 11g of protein, 3g of fat, and a total of 326 calories. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes approximately approximately 45 minutes. This recipe from Foodista requires bone standing beef roast, egg white, pepper, and flat-leaf parsley. It will be a hit at your valentin day event. 1 person were impressed by this recipe. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 45%. This score is solid. Users who liked this recipe also liked Herb-and-salt-crusted Standing Rib Roast With Morel Sauce, Herb-Crusted Standing Rib Roast, and Grill-Roasted Herb-Crusted Standing Rib Roast.

Prime Rib works really well with Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Pinot Noir. Beef and red wine are a classic combination. Generally, leaner cuts of beef go well with light or medium-bodied reds, such as pinot noir or merlot, while fattier cuts can handle a bold red, such as cabernet sauvingnon. One wine you could try is Raymond R Collection Merlot. It has 4.1 out of 5 stars and a bottle costs about 10 dollars.

Raymond R Collection Merlot

The Merlot fills the mouth with smooth cherry, raspberry and plum flavors along with hints of earth and spice in the toasty vanilla finish. Full-bodied, yet approachable, with a good balance of acid and tannins. Pair with anything from grilled salmon, pork tenderloin, barbequed chicken and ribs to Thai red curry or Moroccan tagine.

» Get this wine on Wine.com

Ingredients

Servings:
2 cups
2 cups kosher salt
kosher salt
1 large
1 large egg white
egg white
3 Tbsps
3 Tbsps black pepper
black pepper
3 Tbsps
3 Tbsps fresh thyme
fresh thyme
2 Tbsps
2 Tbsps juniper berries
juniper berries
2 Tbsps
2 Tbsps fresh flat-leaf parsley
fresh flat-leaf parsley
2.5 cups
2.5 cups unbleached flour
unbleached flour
7 lb
7 lb beef bone
beef bone
2 cups kosher salt
2 cups
kosher salt
1 large egg white
1 large
egg white
3 Tbsps black pepper
3 Tbsps
black pepper
3 Tbsps fresh thyme
3 Tbsps
fresh thyme
2 Tbsps juniper berries
2 Tbsps
juniper berries
2 Tbsps fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 Tbsps
fresh flat-leaf parsley
2.5 cups unbleached flour
2.5 cups
unbleached flour
7 lb beef bone
7 lb
beef bone

Equipment

roasting pan
roasting pan
stand mixer
stand mixer
kitchen thermometer
kitchen thermometer
frying pan
frying pan
oven
oven
roasting pan
roasting pan
stand mixer
stand mixer
kitchen thermometer
kitchen thermometer
frying pan
frying pan
oven
oven


Instructions

In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine 1 cup water with the salt, egg white, pepper, thyme, juniper, garlic, and parsley. Mix on medium speed until blended. On medium-low speed, mix in 2 cups of the flour, adding more as needed, until the dough is firm and feels slightly dry and stiff, like Play-Doh. Continue to mix for 2 minutes. The dough should be smooth and firm but not sticky; add more flour if necessary. Flatten the dough into a rectangle, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to 6 hours. An hour before you are ready to roast, put the beef on the counter and let sit at room temperature. Place a rack in the center of the oven and heat oven to 350 degrees F. heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil and put the roast meat side down in the skillet; sear until deeply browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the roast from the pan and set it bone side down on a rack in a roasting pan. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough into a 1/4-inch thick rectangle. Drape the dough over the meat, tucking it in in all sides. Roast until an instant thermometer in the middle of the roast registers 125 degrees F for rare or 135 for medium-rare, 1 3/4 to 2 1/4 hours. Let rest for 20 minutes, then remove and discard crust. Carve and serve.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $3.97
Ingredient
2 cups kosher salt
1 large egg white
3 tablespoons black pepper
3 tablespoons fresh thyme
2 tablespoons juniper berries
2 tablespoons fresh flat-leaf parsley
2.5 cups unbleached flour
7 pounds beef bone
Price
$0.63
$0.20
$0.54
$1.12
$1.88
$0.32
$0.69
$10.51
$15.89

Tips

Health Tips

  • You can easily swap half of the white flour in most recipes for whole wheat flour to add some fiber and protein. It does result in a heavier dough, so for cookies, cakes, etc., you might try swapping in whole wheat pastry flour.

Price Tips

  • Fresh herbs can be expensive, so don't let them go to waste. If you have any leftovers, you might be able to freeze them. The Kitchn recommends freezing hardy herbs like rosemary and thyme in olive oil, while Better Homes and Gardens suggests using freezer bags to freeze basil, chives, mint, and more.

Cooking Tips

  • Don't have fresh herbs? Substitute dried herbs, but use about 1/3 less because dried herbs are more potent than fresh.

  • Fresh herbs should be added toward the end of the cooking process — even at the very last minute?especially delicate herbs like cilantro, basil, and dill. Hardier herbs like bay leaves, rosemary, and thyme can be added earlier.

  • Kosher salt is a type of coarse-grained salt popular among chefs because it is easy to pick up with the fingertips and sticks well when coating meat. The name "kosher salt" comes from the word "koshering", the process of making food suitable for consumption according to Jewish law. You can easily substitute table salt or sea salt in recipes where the salt is being dissolved, but if you're using it to coat meat, you might wish you had the kosher salt.

  • If you have a recipe that calls for bones and you don't have any, you can usually get them for cheap (or even for free) from a butcher.

  • get more cooking tips
Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
325 Calories
11g Protein
2g Total Fat
63g Carbs
11% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
325
16%

Fat
2g
4%

  Saturated Fat
0.28g
2%

Carbohydrates
63g
21%

  Sugar
0.35g
0%

Cholesterol
0.0mg
0%

Sodium
56604mg
2461%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
11g
23%

Manganese
1mg
72%

Selenium
33µg
47%

Vitamin K
40µg
38%

Fiber
3g
15%

Iron
2mg
15%

Copper
0.28mg
14%

Vitamin C
11mg
13%

Magnesium
38mg
10%

Calcium
91mg
9%

Phosphorus
90mg
9%

Vitamin A
444IU
9%

Folate
32µg
8%

Vitamin B2
0.12mg
7%

Zinc
0.98mg
7%

Potassium
206mg
6%

Vitamin B3
0.96mg
5%

Vitamin B1
0.07mg
5%

Vitamin B5
0.45mg
5%

Vitamin B6
0.06mg
3%

Vitamin E
0.37mg
3%

covered percent of daily need

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