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Bacon Wrapped Pork Tenderloin

 
This recipe can be made gluten free by choosing gluten-free versions of basic ingredients commonly found in supermarkets or online.gluten-free
This recipe can be made completely dairy-free.dairy-free
This recipe is suitable for a paleo diet.paleo
This recipe is suitable for a primal diet.primal
 
One serving costs about $2.57 One serving costs about $2.57

$2.57 per serving

55 people like this recipe

55 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

4 gluten-free,dairy-free,paleo,primal,gluten free,dairy free,paleolithic,primal lunch,main course,main dish,dinner
spoonacular Score:95%

Spoonacular Score: 95%

 

Bacon Wrapped Pork Tenderloin is a caveman, gluten free, dairy free, and primal main course. For $2.2 per serving, this recipe covers 30% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. One serving contains 411 calories, 51g of protein, and 21g of fat. A couple people made this recipe, and 55 would say it hit the spot. If you have garlic powder, pepper, sage, and a few other ingredients on hand, you can make it. To use up the black pepper you could follow this main course with the Dr. Pepper Cake with Flour Cooked Frosting as a dessert. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes approximately 45 minutes. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 91%. This score is outstanding. Try Bacon-Wrapped Pork Tenderloin, Bacon Wrapped Pork Tenderloin, and Bacon Wrapped Pork Tenderloin for similar recipes.

Pork Tenderloin works really well with Malbec, Pinot Noir, and Sangiovese. Pinot noir's light body is great for lean cuts, medium bodied sangiovese complement meaty sauces, stews, and other multi-ingredient dishes, and full-bodied tannic malbec pairs with fatty cuts and barbecue. One wine you could try is La Celian Elite Malbec. It has 4.8 out of 5 stars and a bottle costs about 20 dollars.

La Celia Elite Malbec

Complex aromas where the red and juicy fruit stands out, with elegant floral contribution and fresh herbs.The aging in oak has achieved in this wine an exquisite combination prevailing the fruit. In mouth there is an austere entrance and great length. In the mouth, the tannins are soft and silky. Ideal to drink with goat cheese board, contains roasted vaccine, humita, roasted vegetables, pears in Malbec reduction. 

» Get this wine on Wine.com

Ingredients

Servings:
6 slice
6 slice bacon
bacon
some
some black bell pepper
black bell pepper
some
some coarse salt
coarse salt
10 leaf
10 leaf fresh sage
fresh sage
1 pinch
1 pinch garlic powder
garlic powder
2 pounds
2 pounds pork tenderloin
pork tenderloin
6 slice bacon
6 slice
bacon
some black bell pepper
some
black bell pepper
some coarse salt
some
coarse salt
10 leaf fresh sage
10 leaf
fresh sage
1 pinch garlic powder
1 pinch
garlic powder
2 pounds pork tenderloin
2 pounds
pork tenderloin

Equipment

oven
oven
frying pan
frying pan
oven
oven
frying pan
frying pan


Instructions

  1. Remove about an inch off the tapered end of each tenderloin to make a perfect cylinder.
  2. Season with salt, pepper, and a pinch of garlic powder.
  3. Lay the bacon strips in a overlapping line on a sheet of cling wrap. Place sage leaves all over bacon (about 9-10 leaves).
  4. Place 1 piece of tenderloin across the short ends of the bacon and roll to cover with the bacon.
  5. Repeat with the other tenderloin segments.
  6. Preheat oven to 425 F.
  7. Place the tenderloin in non-stick pan and sear on all sides over medium-high heat.
  8. Transfer the pan to the preheated oven and cook for 8-10 minutes, turning the pieces after 5 minutes to ensure even cooking.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $2.57
Ingredient
6 slices bacon
some black bell pepper
10 leaves fresh sage
2 pounds pork tenderloin
Price
$1.70
$1.50
$0.04
$7.06
$10.29

Tips

Health Tips

  • Although the body needs salt to survive, most of us get too much. The problem with consuming too much salt (what chemists call "sodium chloride") is actually the sodium part, which is why people concerned about high blood pressure go on low-sodium diets. If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet, you can try salt substitutes like potassium chloride or try to make do with less salt by using more black pepper, herbs, and spices.

  • Don't make the mistake of assuming turkey bacon is healthier than pork bacon. Read the labels and look for short ingredient lists (not too many artificial ingredients, preservatives, and other additives). If you're watching your sodium intake, pay attention to that too. It is also important to note that the American Institute for Cancer Research has stated the consumption of ANY processed meat could increase your risk of developing cancer. Although it is not yet clear what causes the increased cancer risk, it could be the preservatives or other chemicals commonly used during processing.

  • Sea salt is not healthier than table salt, contrary to what you may have heard. Sea salt is usually 97.5% sodium chloride (same as regular old table salt) and the minerals accounting for the rest are too insignificant to make a difference?unless you plan on consuming sea salt by the pound, in which case the health benefits from the minerals will definitely be outweighed by the negative effects of all the sodium you are consuming!

Price Tips

  • Sea salt can add a unique texture or provide bursts of salty goodness, but ONLY when it isn't being dissolved. So if you have expensive sea salt, save it for sprinkling on salads or dark chocolate cookies, don't try to use it in your pasta sauce or soup. Once sea salt dissolves, the flavor is indistinguishable from table salt from the shaker (after all, they are chemically the same thing, sodium chloride).

  • If you find meat (especially grassfed and/or organic meat!) on sale, stock up and freeze it. Ground meat will stay good 3-4 months, while steaks, chops, etc., will be fine for at least 4 months.

Cooking Tips

  • If you have too much bacon (is this even possible?) you can freeze individual slices by laying them between sheets of wax paper. Even better, you can put them on a single sheet of wax paper and roll the paper in such a way that you can just unroll it later and remove however many slices you want.

  • Surprising tip: you will end up with better bacon if you add water to the skillet when cooking it on the stovetop. For large amounts of bacon, you can also prepare bacon in the oven.

Green Tips

  • Choose organic, pasture raised pork to avoid antibiotics, hormones, and genetically modified feed. It is better for your health, for the animals, and for the planet. If you're worried about your grocery budget, try eating vegetarian meals more often during the week so you can splurge on better meat on the weekends.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
433k Calories
51g Protein
21g Total Fat
4g Carbs
51% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
433k
22%

Fat
21g
33%

  Saturated Fat
7g
44%

Carbohydrates
4g
2%

  Sugar
3g
3%

Cholesterol
169mg
56%

Sodium
533mg
23%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
51g
103%

Vitamin B1
2mg
157%

Vitamin C
95mg
115%

Selenium
75µg
108%

Vitamin B6
2mg
102%

Vitamin B3
17mg
85%

Phosphorus
618mg
62%

Vitamin B2
0.85mg
50%

Vitamin A
2349IU
47%

Zinc
4mg
32%

Potassium
1114mg
32%

Copper
0.54mg
27%

Vitamin B5
2mg
23%

Vitamin B12
1µg
22%

Magnesium
74mg
19%

Iron
2mg
15%

Vitamin E
1mg
12%

Folate
34µg
9%

Manganese
0.13mg
6%

Fiber
1g
6%

Vitamin D
0.81µg
5%

Vitamin K
3µg
3%

Calcium
21mg
2%

covered percent of daily need

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