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Spiced Tomato Gratin...My Way

 
One serving costs about $0.69

$0.69 per serving

1 people like this recipe

1 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

6 vegetarian,gluten-free,gluten free,lacto ovo vegetarian side dish
spoonacular Score:19%

Spoonacular Score: 19%

 

Spiced Tomato Gratin...My Way could be just the gluten free and lacto ovo vegetarian recipe you've been looking for. One serving contains 233 calories, 2g of protein, and 19g of fat. For 69 cents per serving, this recipe covers 6% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. This recipe serves 6. A mixture of oz/ 910 tomatoes, onions, pepper flakes, and a handful of other ingredients are all it takes to make this recipe so scrumptious. Only a few people made this recipe, and 1 would say it hit the spot. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes approximately approximately 45 minutes. It is brought to you by Foodista. It works well as a side dish. With a spoonacular score of 14%, this dish is not so super. Try Spiced Potato Gratin, Spiced Sweet Potato Gratin, and Spiced Sweet Potato Gratin for similar recipes.

Ingredients

Servings:
1 tsp
1 tsp whole cumin seeds
whole cumin seeds
2 tsps
2 tsps curry powder
curry powder
0.5 tsps
0.5 tsps red pepper flakes
red pepper flakes
0.25 cup
0.25 cup olive oil
olive oil
6 cups
6 cups yellow onions
yellow onions
1 Tbsp
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
unsalted butter
0.04 oz
0.04 oz potatoes
potatoes
0.5 cup
0.5 cup heavy cream
heavy cream
0.07 oz
0.07 oz tomatoes
tomatoes
1 small handful
1 small handful fresh basil leaves
fresh basil leaves
some
some sea-salt
sea-salt
1 tsp whole cumin seeds
1 tsp
whole cumin seeds
2 tsps curry powder
2 tsps
curry powder
0.5 tsps red pepper flakes
0.5 tsps
red pepper flakes
0.25 cup olive oil
0.25 cup
olive oil
6 cups yellow onions
6 cups
yellow onions
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 Tbsp
unsalted butter
0.04 oz potatoes
0.04 oz
potatoes
0.5 cup heavy cream
0.5 cup
heavy cream
0.07 oz tomatoes
0.07 oz
tomatoes
1 small handful fresh basil leaves
1 small handful
fresh basil leaves
some sea-salt
some
sea-salt

Equipment

aluminum foil
aluminum foil
baking pan
baking pan
dutch oven
dutch oven
mandoline
mandoline
oven
oven
knife
knife
bowl
bowl
aluminum foil
aluminum foil
baking pan
baking pan
dutch oven
dutch oven
mandoline
mandoline
oven
oven
knife
knife
bowl
bowl


Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350F / 180C with a rack in the top third. Combine the spices in a small bowl and set aside. You can get a jump start on the onions while you slice the potatoes and tomatoes. Heat half of the olive oil, 2 tablespoons, in your largest skillet or dutch oven over high heat. When hot, stir in the onions along with a few pinches of salt. Cook for a few minutes, stirring often, until the onions soften up - 4-5 minutes. Turn the heat down to medium and stir in the butter. Stirring regularly, cook another 10 - 15 minutes at this temperature, or until the onions just begin to caramelize a bit. Dial the heat back a shade more, and cook until the onions are deeply golden, this might take another 20 minutes. A minute before the onions are finished cooking In the meantime, use a mandoline to slice the potatoes into 1/8-inch thick rounds. Place in a medium bowl along with the cream, 1 teaspoon of salt, and bit of pepper. Toss well, and set aside. Use a knife to cut the tomatoes into 1/4-inch thick slices. Arrange across a large plate and sprinkle with another teaspoon of salt and some pepper. Smear half the caramelized onions across the bottom of a 10x10 inch (or equivalent) gratin or baking dish. Take half of the potatoes and half of the tomatoes and arrange on top of the onion layer (see photo). Drizzle with a couple tablespoons of cream from the potatoes and a tablespoon of olive oil. Season the layer with a pinch of salt and half the basil. Scatter the remaining onions across the potatoes and tomatoes already in the pan. Then arrange another layer of tomatoes and potatoes on top. This will be the top of your gratin, so do your best to make it look nice. Pour the remaining cream, from the potatoes, and last tablespoon of olive oil across the top. Season with another pinch of salt and the remaining basil. Gently press down on the vegetables so the cream comes up through the layers of vegetables evenly. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 2 hours, or until the potatoes are completely tender throughout. Increase the oven to 450F / 230C, carefully uncover the gratin, and cook another 30 minutes, or until the top takes on a nice golden color. Serves 10 as a side.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $0.69
Ingredient
1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds
2 teaspoons curry powder
½ teaspoons red pepper flakes
¼ cups olive oil
6 cups yellow onions
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
½ cups heavy cream
1 small handful fresh basil leaves
Price
$0.26
$0.20
$0.05
$0.64
$2.11
$0.12
$0.65
$0.08
$4.12

Tips

Health Tips

  • Although the body needs salt to survive, most of us get too much. The problem with consuming too much salt (what chemists call "sodium chloride") is actually the sodium part, which is why people concerned about high blood pressure go on low-sodium diets. If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet, you can try salt substitutes like potassium chloride or try to make do with less salt by using more black pepper, herbs, and spices.

  • Lycopene, the chemical in tomatoes that makes them red (and healthy), is fat soluble. This means eating tomatoes with a fat — say, avocado or olive oil?improves the body's ability to absorb the lycopene. Don't hesitate to include some healthy fats in this dish to get the most health benefits from the tomatoes!

  • If you can, choose grassfed butter for a better nutritional profile—more vitamins, a favorable omega 3/6 ratio, etc.

  • Sea salt is not healthier than table salt, contrary to what you may have heard. Sea salt is usually 97.5% sodium chloride (same as regular old table salt) and the minerals accounting for the rest are too insignificant to make a difference?unless you plan on consuming sea salt by the pound, in which case the health benefits from the minerals will definitely be outweighed by the negative effects of all the sodium you are consuming!

  • get more health tips

Price Tips

  • Sea salt can add a unique texture or provide bursts of salty goodness, but ONLY when it isn't being dissolved. So if you have expensive sea salt, save it for sprinkling on salads or dark chocolate cookies, don't try to use it in your pasta sauce or soup. Once sea salt dissolves, the flavor is indistinguishable from table salt from the shaker (after all, they are chemically the same thing, sodium chloride).

  • Most dairy products stay good well past their sell-by date. Instead of throwing out perfectly safe food that is just a few days or maybe even a week or two old, make sure the product smells fine, has a normal texture, and doesn't taste funny. Sniff testing isn't exactly rocket science and it can keep you from wasting food (and money).

  • Fresh herbs can be expensive, so don't let them go to waste. If you have any leftovers, you might be able to freeze them. The Kitchn recommends freezing hardy herbs like rosemary and thyme in olive oil, while Better Homes and Gardens suggests using freezer bags to freeze basil, chives, mint, and more.

Cooking Tips

  • Butter's incredible flavor has made it an extremely popular cooking fat, but it is important to know that butter has the lowest smoke point of almost any cooking fat. This means butter literally starts to smoke at a lower temperature than most other fats between 250-350 degrees Fahrenheit. So while butter is great for cooking at lower temperatures, you should probably use canola oil, coconut oil, or another oil with a higher smoke point for frying and other high temperature cooking.

  • Fresh herbs should be added toward the end of the cooking process — even at the very last minute?especially delicate herbs like cilantro, basil, and dill. Hardier herbs like bay leaves, rosemary, and thyme can be added earlier.

  • Confused by the different types of cream — Most differences arise from the fat content of the cream, and whether or not the cream has been "soured" by adding lactic acid bacteria to give it a tangy flavor.

  • You should not store your onions with your potatoes because the gases they emit will make each other spoil faster. For more information about selecting and storing onions, check out this lesson about onions in the academy.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • Tomatoes, especially cherry tomatoes, should be bought organic when possible. Moreover, buying tomatoes from your local farmers' market when they are in season is going to make your dish much, much tastier, not to mention more eco-friendly. In fact, we recommend using canned — or better yet, jarred?tomato products when tomatoes aren't in season instead of buying imported or greenhouse-grown tomatoes.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
232k Calories
2g Protein
18g Total Fat
16g Carbs
2% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
232k
12%

Fat
18g
29%

  Saturated Fat
7g
44%

Carbohydrates
16g
5%

  Sugar
6g
8%

Cholesterol
32mg
11%

Sodium
50mg
2%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
2g
5%

Vitamin C
12mg
15%

Manganese
0.25mg
13%

Fiber
3g
12%

Vitamin E
1mg
12%

Vitamin B6
0.21mg
11%

Vitamin K
9µg
9%

Vitamin A
433IU
9%

Folate
32µg
8%

Potassium
271mg
8%

Phosphorus
64mg
6%

Calcium
57mg
6%

Vitamin B1
0.08mg
6%

Magnesium
20mg
5%

Iron
0.85mg
5%

Vitamin B2
0.07mg
4%

Copper
0.08mg
4%

Vitamin B5
0.25mg
3%

Zinc
0.37mg
2%

Selenium
1µg
2%

Vitamin B3
0.26mg
1%

Vitamin D
0.17µg
1%

covered percent of daily need

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