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Rhubarb Roasted Chicken and Potatoes With Crispy Kale Chips

 
This recipe belongs to the top 10% of the healthiest recipes.healthy
This recipe can be made gluten free by choosing gluten-free versions of basic ingredients commonly found in supermarkets or online.gluten-free
This recipe can be made completely dairy-free.dairy-free
 
One serving costs about $4.84 One serving costs about $4.84

$4.84 per serving

1 people like this recipe

1 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

2 spring,mother's day,gluten-free,dairy-free,healthy,gluten free,dairy free lunch,main course,main dish,dinner
spoonacular Score:87%

Spoonacular Score: 87%

 

You can never have too many main course recipes, so give Rhubarb Roasted Chicken and Potatoes With Crispy Kale Chips a try. One serving contains 1315 calories, 44g of protein, and 26g of fat. This gluten free and dairy free recipe serves 2 and costs $4.84 per serving. Mother's Day will be even more special with this recipe. 1 person were impressed by this recipe. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes around around 45 minutes. If you have chicken, rhubarb, several sprigs of rosemary, and a few other ingredients on hand, you can make it. It is brought to you by Foodista. Taking all factors into account, this recipe earns a spoonacular score of 87%, which is amazing. Users who liked this recipe also liked Sheet-Pan Chicken Saltimbocca With Roasted Potatoes and Crispy Kale, Roasted Chicken Dinner with Potatoes and Artichokes on a Bed of Crispy Kale, and Crispy Kale Chips.

Ingredients

Servings:
0.48 lb
0.48 lb bone-in chicken
bone-in chicken
12 small
12 small red potatoes
red potatoes
1 sprigs
1 sprigs fresh rosemary
fresh rosemary
1 bunch
1 bunch kale
kale
1 lb
1 lb fresh rhubarb
fresh rhubarb
0.25 cups
0.25 cups honey
honey
0.25 cups
0.25 cups sugar
sugar
some
some EVOO
EVOO
some
some sea salt
sea salt
some
some black pepper
black pepper
0.48 lb bone-in chicken
0.48 lb
bone-in chicken
12 small red potatoes
12 small
red potatoes
1 sprigs fresh rosemary
1 sprigs
fresh rosemary
1 bunch kale
1 bunch
kale
1 lb fresh rhubarb
1 lb
fresh rhubarb
0.25 cups honey
0.25 cups
honey
0.25 cups sugar
0.25 cups
sugar
some EVOO
some
EVOO
some sea salt
some
sea salt
some black pepper
some
black pepper

Equipment

baking sheet
baking sheet
paper towels
paper towels
tongs
tongs
oven
oven
baking sheet
baking sheet
paper towels
paper towels
tongs
tongs
oven
oven


Instructions

First, I set the oven to a healthy 400 degrees. Then, I dig into my potatoes. These are actually leftover from another meal; I had a perfect amount of these little guys left for one more party. Then I cut their little outfits into middrifts and low-waisters. Read: I skinned their middles out. Next, I wash, pat dry, salt, pepper, and chugalug EVOO over my lovely thighs. My lovely chicken thighs, that is. I stud my thighs with little spud balls and shove some rosemary sprigs in all the gaps and crannies. Then I glugachug another douse of EVOO over the whole dish for good measure, before setting it into my hot oven for 30 minutes to roast. While my chicken and potatoes roast, I dress my trimmed rhubarb with my honey and sugar, then I set this mess aside to soak bask and absorb in its cross-cultural deliciousness. Then, I cut the stems and hard spines off my kale, before washing and spinning it thoroughly and drying it even more thoroughly with paper towels. Kale is so sturdy, you can squeeze it in between sheets of papers to absorb all the water sticking to the leaves. Make sure its good and dry, and make sure you break out only the finest of your EVOOs to douse it with. I thank the Doctor again for his gracious donation to Lolitas kitchen. I dress my kale carefully with my EVOO, not just tossing the leaves in oil, but using my fingers to rub each curly surface completely until the entire surface, on both sides, is glossy. I spread these leaves out single layer on two cookie sheets. After 30 minutes, my chicken has begun to brown, my potatoes are almost tender to the forkpierce, and the EVOO and chickenfatO are sizzling on the porcelain surface. Its time to add the sweet to this succulence. Using tongs, I pick up and move my chicken thighs and potaotes out of the way only in order to layer my honeysweetened rhubarb underneath them. I set this platter rhubarb topped with chicken studded with spuds and rosemary and sizzling in fats back into the oven, alongside my sheet pans of oiled kale, for final 15 minutes. My simply spiced salt and pepper chicken has crisp skin and its own amazing flavor. My spuds are silky tender in the center, with crisp blistered skin on the edges. The rhubarb has softened and sweetened, but is also tart and structured, toothsome and tender. The kale is so surprisingly crispy and ethereal; at the last moment, I sprinkled it with sea salt, and it crackles like paper, thin like the finest spun sugar, charred on the ruffles like the lace edges of a fine doily caught too close to the flame. This is a meal of incredible complexity, all accomplished with only several ingredients and a most moderate amount of effort. For my students flying the coop in the next few weeks, among my wishes for your fame, your riches, your accomplishments, and your true deep happinesses and joys, I hope you learn how to cook a

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $4.84
Ingredient
1 pound bone-in chicken
12 smalls red potatoes
1 sprig fresh rosemary
1 bunch kale
1 pound fresh rhubarb
¼ cups honey
¼ cups sugar
some EVOO
Price
$1.45
$3.63
$0.01
$0.57
$2.75
$1.03
$0.07
$0.17
$9.68

Tips

Health Tips

  • Sea salt is not healthier than table salt, contrary to what you may have heard. Sea salt is usually 97.5% sodium chloride (same as regular old table salt) and the minerals accounting for the rest are too insignificant to make a difference?unless you plan on consuming sea salt by the pound, in which case the health benefits from the minerals will definitely be outweighed by the negative effects of all the sodium you are consuming!

  • Many people will tell you to remove the skin on your chicken to cut down on fat. This is true, but if you like the taste, leave it on! You're only gaining a little fat for a lot of flavor. Plus, a little over half of the fat in chicken skin is monounsatured fat (that's a heart-healthy kind) and the notion that saturated fat is unhealthy is being questioned too. So in our opinion: dig in, skin and all!

  • Although the body needs salt to survive, most of us get too much. The problem with consuming too much salt (what chemists call "sodium chloride") is actually the sodium part, which is why people concerned about high blood pressure go on low-sodium diets. If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet, you can try salt substitutes like potassium chloride or try to make do with less salt by using more black pepper, herbs, and spices.

  • If you're trying to cut back on sugar, consider replacing some of the sugar in this recipe with a sweetener like Stevia or Splenda. If you're against these kinds of sweeteners, start reducing the amount of real sugar you use until your tastebuds adjust.

  • get more health tips

Price Tips

  • Sea salt can add a unique texture or provide bursts of salty goodness, but ONLY when it isn't being dissolved. So if you have expensive sea salt, save it for sprinkling on salads or dark chocolate cookies, don't try to use it in your pasta sauce or soup. Once sea salt dissolves, the flavor is indistinguishable from table salt from the shaker (after all, they are chemically the same thing, sodium chloride).

  • If you find meat (especially grassfed and/or organic meat!) on sale, stock up and freeze it. Ground meat will stay good 3-4 months, while steaks, chops, etc., will be fine for at least 4 months.

Cooking Tips

  • Extra-virgin olive oil is the least refined type of olive oil and therefore contains more of the beneficial compounds that get lost during processing. However, its minimal processing could also mean it has a lower smoke point than other olive oils. Once an oil starts to smoke, it begins to break down, producing a bad flavor and potentially harmful compounds. Unfortunately, the smoke point of an oil depends on so many factors that it is hard to say what the smoke point of an oil really is. For extra-virgin olive oil, it could be anywhere between 200-400 degrees Fahrenheit. Most people recommend using extra-virgin olive oil to add flavor to a finished dish or in cold dishes to be on the safe side. More refined olive oils, canola oil, coconut oil, and clarified butter/ghee are better options for high temperature cooking.

  • If you normally rinse your chicken?stop! You could be spreading bacteria around your kitchen and it isn't really necessary.

Green Tips

  • Choose pasture-raised chicken if it is available. If it is not at your supermarket, visit a farmers' market and ask around.

  • Buying local honey from beekeepers in your area not only supports your community but helps those beekeepers protect bees! LocalHarvest can help you locate some tasty honey produced near you.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
1315 Calories
44g Protein
25g Total Fat
238g Carbs
87% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
1315
66%

Fat
25g
40%

  Saturated Fat
6g
39%

Carbohydrates
238g
79%

  Sugar
75g
84%

Cholesterol
81mg
27%

Sodium
392mg
17%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
44g
89%

Vitamin K
560µg
533%

Vitamin C
185mg
225%

Potassium
5842mg
167%

Vitamin A
6950IU
139%

Copper
2mg
123%

Manganese
2mg
119%

Vitamin B6
2mg
118%

Vitamin B3
20mg
103%

Phosphorus
875mg
88%

Fiber
21g
86%

Magnesium
304mg
76%

Vitamin B1
1mg
67%

Folate
227µg
57%

Iron
10mg
56%

Vitamin B5
4mg
41%

Calcium
410mg
41%

Zinc
5mg
37%

Vitamin B2
0.62mg
37%

Selenium
24µg
35%

Vitamin E
2mg
14%

Vitamin B12
0.34µg
6%

Vitamin D
0.22µg
1%

covered percent of daily need

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