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Pumpkin Caramel Apple Pie

 
One serving costs about $2.88 One serving costs about $2.88

$2.88 per serving

2 people like this recipe

2 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

8 halloween American
spoonacular Score:56%

Spoonacular Score: 56%

 

Pumpkin Caramel Apple Pie might be just the American recipe you are searching for. For $2.88 per serving, this recipe covers 25% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. This recipe makes 8 servings with 1139 calories, 13g of protein, and 49g of fat each. It can be enjoyed any time, but it is especially good for Halloween. If you have graham cracker crust, salt, pumpkin puree, and a few other ingredients on hand, you can make it. 2 people were glad they tried this recipe. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes around around 45 minutes. It is brought to you by Foodista. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 57%. This score is pretty good. If you like this recipe, you might also like recipes such as Caramel Apple Pumpkin Spice Muffins with Salted Caramel Glaze, Apple Pecan Pie Cronuts with Apple Cider Caramel Drizzle, and Caramel Apple Crumb Pie Best Pie Bakeoff 2008 Entry #1.

Apple Pie works really well with Late Harvest Riesling, Moscato d'Asti, and Prosecco. These dessert wines have the right amount of sweetness and light, fruity flavors that won't overpower apple pie. The Chateau Chantal Late Harvest Riesling with a 4.5 out of 5 star rating seems like a good match. It costs about 21 dollars per bottle.

Chateau Chantal Late Harvest Riesling



» Get this wine on Amazon.com

Ingredients

Servings:
9 Inch
9 Inch graham cracker crust
graham cracker crust
21 oz
21 oz apple pie filling
apple pie filling
1 Envelope
1 Envelope unflavored gelatin
unflavored gelatin
4 Tbs
4 Tbs cornstarch
cornstarch
0.75 tsps
0.75 tsps pumpkin pie spice
pumpkin pie spice
0.13 tsps
0.13 tsps salt
salt
1 tsp
1 tsp cinnamon
cinnamon
15 oz
15 oz pumpkin puree
pumpkin puree
1 oz
1 oz evaporated milk
evaporated milk
2
2  eggs
eggs
0.5 cups
0.5 cups sugar
sugar
9 Inch graham cracker crust
9 Inch
graham cracker crust
21 oz apple pie filling
21 oz
apple pie filling
1 Envelope unflavored gelatin
1 Envelope
unflavored gelatin
4 Tbs cornstarch
4 Tbs
cornstarch
0.75 tsps pumpkin pie spice
0.75 tsps
pumpkin pie spice
0.13 tsps salt
0.13 tsps
salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp
cinnamon
15 oz pumpkin puree
15 oz
pumpkin puree
1 oz evaporated milk
1 oz
evaporated milk
2  eggs
2
eggs
0.5 cups sugar
0.5 cups
sugar

Equipment

sauce pan
sauce pan
sauce pan
sauce pan


Instructions

Spread the caramel apple pie filling evenly into the bottom of the pie crust, set aside while you work on the pumpkin filling. In a large sauce pan combine the gelatin, cornstarch, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon and salt. Stir in the evaporated milk and pumpkin puree; let the mixture sit for 5 minutes to soften the gelatin. Cook over medium heat until the mixture comes to a bubble, cook and stir for another 2 minutes. Remove from heat then gradually stir 1 cup of the pumpkin mixture into the beaten eggs; return all egg mixture into the sauce pan. Return to the heat, cook and stir for another 2 minutes but do not boil. Remove from heat and stir in the sugar. Once the pumpkin mixture is ready carefully spread over the apple pie filling, cover and refrigerate for 6-24 hours.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $2.88
Ingredient
9 Inchs graham cracker crust
21 ounces apple pie filling
1 Envelope unflavored gelatin
4 Tbs cornstarch
¾ Tsps pumpkin pie spice
1 Tsp cinnamon
15 ounces pumpkin puree
1 ounce evaporated milk
2 eggs
½ Cs sugar
Price
$16.39
$2.55
$0.50
$0.14
$0.26
$0.11
$2.43
$0.07
$0.48
$0.14
$23.06

Tips

Health Tips

  • Although the body needs salt to survive, most of us get too much. The problem with consuming too much salt (what chemists call "sodium chloride") is actually the sodium part, which is why people concerned about high blood pressure go on low-sodium diets. If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet, you can try salt substitutes like potassium chloride or try to make do with less salt by using more black pepper, herbs, and spices.

  • If you're trying to cut back on sugar, consider replacing some of the sugar in this recipe with a sweetener like Stevia or Splenda. If you're against these kinds of sweeteners, start reducing the amount of real sugar you use until your tastebuds adjust.

  • If you're worried about cholesterol and heart disease, you may have heard you should limit your egg consumption to one egg per day or eat only egg whites. However, new research suggests you might go ahead and eat your whole eggs. It turns out egg yolk contains valuable nutrients (the cartenoids that make it yellow are great for eye health, folic acid is great for brain health, and it has vitamins A, E, D, and K) and dietary cholesterol seems to have little influence on blood cholesterol levels.

Cooking Tips

  • Corn starch can be added directly to cold liquids, but to avoid lumps corn starch must be mixed with a cold liquid (usually water or stock) before it can be added to hot liquids like soup or gravy. This mixture of corn starch in a cold liquid is called a "slurry."

  • Making pumpkin pie spice yourself is easy. It is usually just a blend of ground cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and allspice.

  • Corn starch, potato starch, arrowroot powder, and tapioca powder are all comparable in terms of thickening ability, so you can usually substitute them 1:1. Flour, on the other hand, is only half as effective, so if you are using flour instead of corn starch or one of the others named, you'll need to use twice as much.

  • There are two types of cinnamon. The more expensive and rarer type is Ceylon cinnamon (considered to be "true cinnamon"). The cinnamon most common in North America is cassia cinnamon. Though the flavor is certainly similar, Ceylon cinnamon is said to be more subtle yet also more complex.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • Choose free range or organic eggs whenever possible! Even though they are more expensive, eggs are generally cheap to begin with, and eggs from cage-free chickens are worth the extra cost.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
1139 Calories
12g Protein
49g Total Fat
163g Carbs
18% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
1139
57%

Fat
49g
75%

  Saturated Fat
10g
63%

Carbohydrates
163g
55%

  Sugar
59g
66%

Cholesterol
41mg
14%

Sodium
996mg
43%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
12g
26%

Vitamin A
8361IU
167%

Manganese
2mg
132%

Vitamin K
50µg
48%

Iron
6mg
35%

Folate
136µg
34%

Vitamin B3
6mg
32%

Vitamin B2
0.51mg
30%

Vitamin E
4mg
28%

Copper
0.56mg
28%

Phosphorus
277mg
28%

Vitamin B1
0.38mg
25%

Fiber
6g
25%

Zinc
2mg
18%

Magnesium
60mg
15%

Selenium
9µg
13%

Potassium
387mg
11%

Vitamin B6
0.21mg
10%

Calcium
92mg
9%

Vitamin B5
0.78mg
8%

Vitamin C
3mg
4%

Vitamin B12
0.1µg
2%

Vitamin D
0.22µg
1%

covered percent of daily need

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