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Meaty One Dish Risotto

 
One serving costs about $2.48

$2.48 per serving

1 people like this recipe

1 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

6 gluten-free,gluten free lunch,main course,main dish,dinner mediterranean,european,italian
spoonacular Score:64%

Spoonacular Score: 64%

 

The recipe Meaty One Dish Risotto is ready in about 45 minutes and is definitely a great gluten free and primal option for lovers of Mediterranean food. For $1.7 per serving, this recipe covers 16% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. This recipe makes 6 servings with 171 calories, 8g of protein, and 10g of fat each. 1 person has tried and liked this recipe. Not a lot of people really liked this side dish. Head to the store and pick up spinach, veggie broth, wine, and a few other things to make it today. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 48%. This score is pretty good. Similar recipes include Four-Cheese Manicotti – a cheesy and meaty hearty pasta dish perfect anytime, Creamy Asparagus Risotto Side Dish, and Risotto Mouselin (Rice and Prosciutto Dish).

Ingredients

Servings:
0.25 tsps
0.25 tsps basil
basil
3 cups
3 cups broth
broth
1
1  chicken breast
chicken breast
1 cup
1 cup cooked ham
cooked ham
0.25 cups
0.25 cups cream
cream
10 oz
10 oz frozen spinach
frozen spinach
0.22 cloves
0.22 cloves garlic
garlic
0.25 cups
0.25 cups gorgonzola cheese
gorgonzola cheese
0.13 tsps
0.13 tsps nutmeg
nutmeg
1 small
1 small onion
onion
some
some bell pepper
bell pepper
some
some salt
salt
2 Tbsps
2 Tbsps unsalted butter
unsalted butter
1 cup
1 cup white wine
white wine
0.25 tsps basil
0.25 tsps
basil
3 cups broth
3 cups
broth
1  chicken breast
1
chicken breast
1 cup cooked ham
1 cup
cooked ham
0.25 cups cream
0.25 cups
cream
10 oz frozen spinach
10 oz
frozen spinach
0.22 cloves garlic
0.22 cloves
garlic
0.25 cups gorgonzola cheese
0.25 cups
gorgonzola cheese
0.13 tsps nutmeg
0.13 tsps
nutmeg
1 small onion
1 small
onion
some bell pepper
some
bell pepper
some salt
some
salt
2 Tbsps unsalted butter
2 Tbsps
unsalted butter
1 cup white wine
1 cup
white wine

Equipment

frying pan
frying pan
frying pan
frying pan


Instructions

  1. Heat up your butter in a large skillet over medium heat and add in your garlic, and onion. Cook it up for a minute or two and then add in your chopped chicken breast. Let the chicken cook up for a few minutes and then add in the cubed ham. Let it continue to cook until the juices on the chicken run clear.
  2. Add in the rice and let it brown up for 3 to 4 minutes.
  3. Mix together your broth and wine. Add the liquid, 1 cup at a time and allow it to cook down, stirring occasionally. Continue adding a cup at a time after each one finishes cooking down. Cover your pan for the last two cups of added liquid.
  4. When all the liquid is cooked in, add in your nutmeg, pepper and basil. Turn your heat down to low and add in your cream and cheese. Finally, stir in your spinach.
  5. Stir it all together and allow it a minute or two to heat back up.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $2.48
Ingredient
3 cups broth
1 chicken breast
1 cup cooked ham
¼ cups cream
10 ounces frozen spinach
2 cloves garlic
¼ cups gorgonzola cheese
⅛ teaspoons nutmeg
1 small onion
some bell pepper
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup white wine
Price
$2.27
$2.00
$1.90
$0.32
$1.92
$0.13
$0.44
$0.02
$0.15
$2.24
$0.24
$3.25
$14.90

Tips

Health Tips

  • Many people will tell you to remove the skin on your chicken to cut down on fat. This is true, but if you like the taste, leave it on! You're only gaining a little fat for a lot of flavor. Plus, a little over half of the fat in chicken skin is monounsatured fat (that's a heart-healthy kind) and the notion that saturated fat is unhealthy is being questioned too. So in our opinion: dig in, skin and all!

  • Although the body needs salt to survive, most of us get too much. The problem with consuming too much salt (what chemists call "sodium chloride") is actually the sodium part, which is why people concerned about high blood pressure go on low-sodium diets. If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet, you can try salt substitutes like potassium chloride or try to make do with less salt by using more black pepper, herbs, and spices.

  • If you can, choose grassfed butter for a better nutritional profile—more vitamins, a favorable omega 3/6 ratio, etc.

  • Before you pass up garlic because you don't want the bad breath that comes with it, keep in mind that the compounds that cause garlic breath also offer a lot of health benefits. Garlic has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and antiviral properties. If you really want to get the most health benefits out of your garlic, choose Spanish garlic, which contains the most allicin (one of garlic's most beneficial compounds).

  • get more health tips

Price Tips

  • Fresh herbs can be expensive, so don't let them go to waste. If you have any leftovers, you might be able to freeze them. The Kitchn recommends freezing hardy herbs like rosemary and thyme in olive oil, while Better Homes and Gardens suggests using freezer bags to freeze basil, chives, mint, and more.

  • Most dairy products stay good well past their sell-by date. Instead of throwing out perfectly safe food that is just a few days or maybe even a week or two old, make sure the product smells fine, has a normal texture, and doesn't taste funny. Sniff testing isn't exactly rocket science and it can keep you from wasting food (and money).

  • If you find meat (especially grassfed and/or organic meat!) on sale, stock up and freeze it. Ground meat will stay good 3-4 months, while steaks, chops, etc., will be fine for at least 4 months.

Cooking Tips

  • You should not store your onions with your potatoes because the gases they emit will make each other spoil faster. For more information about selecting and storing onions, check out this lesson about onions in the academy.

  • Here's a trick for peeling garlic quickly. Put the garlic clove on your cutting board. Take a knife with a thick blade and place the blade flat across the garlic clove (the clove should be closer to the handle than the middle of the blade). Whack down on the flat side of the blade with your free hand to smoosh the garlic a bit. Done correctly, the skin will peel right off.

  • Don't have fresh herbs? Substitute dried herbs, but use about 1/3 less because dried herbs are more potent than fresh.

  • To keep your eyes from stinging and watering while cutting onions, trying popping the onion in the freezer for 15 minutes before you plan to start cooking. Chilling the onion slows the release of the enzyme responsible for teary eyes.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • Choose pasture-raised chicken if it is available. If it is not at your supermarket, visit a farmers' market and ask around.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
237 Calories
15g Protein
11g Total Fat
10g Carbs
23% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
237
12%

Fat
11g
18%

  Saturated Fat
6g
38%

Carbohydrates
10g
4%

  Sugar
5g
6%

Cholesterol
65mg
22%

Sodium
1035mg
45%

Alcohol
4g
23%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
15g
31%

Vitamin K
180µg
172%

Vitamin A
8433IU
169%

Vitamin C
103mg
126%

Vitamin B6
0.69mg
34%

Vitamin B3
5mg
28%

Selenium
19µg
28%

Folate
109µg
27%

Manganese
0.51mg
26%

Phosphorus
214mg
21%

Vitamin E
2mg
19%

Vitamin B2
0.29mg
17%

Potassium
583mg
17%

Magnesium
65mg
16%

Vitamin B1
0.22mg
15%

Fiber
3g
13%

Vitamin B5
1mg
11%

Calcium
109mg
11%

Iron
1mg
9%

Zinc
1mg
9%

Vitamin B12
0.42µg
7%

Copper
0.13mg
6%

Vitamin D
0.2µg
1%

covered percent of daily need

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