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Kobe Sirloin Tips In Mushroom Wine Sauce With Duck Fat Potato Dominoes and Rocket

 
One serving costs about $19.69 One serving costs about $19.69 One serving costs about $19.69

$19.69 per serving

1 people like this recipe

1 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

1 gluten-free,healthy,gluten free lunch,main course,main dish,dinner
spoonacular Score:20%

Spoonacular Score: 20%

 

Kobe Sirloin Tips In Mushroom Wine Sauce With Duck Fat Potato Dominoes and Rocket is a gluten free recipe with 1 servings. One portion of this dish contains around 138g of protein, 55g of fat, and a total of 1928 calories. For $19.69 per serving, this recipe covers 73% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. 1 person were glad they tried this recipe. Head to the store and pick up duck fat, cornstarch, onion, and a few other things to make it today. Not a lot of people really liked this main course. It is brought to you by Foodista. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes about 45 minutes. With a spoonacular score of 80%, this dish is awesome. Similar recipes are Duck Salad with Grilled Pear, Rocket and Red Wine Vinaigrette, Duck Salad with Grilled Pear, Rocket and Red Wine Vinaigrette, and Beef Sirloin Tips with Smokey Pepper Sauce.

Porterhouse Steak can be paired with Pinot Noir, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon. Beef and red wine are a classic combination. Generally, leaner cuts of beef go well with light or medium-bodied reds, such as pinot noir or merlot, while fattier cuts can handle a bold red, such as cabernet sauvingnon. You could try The Donum Estate Russian River Valley Pinot Noir. Reviewers quite like it with a 4.9 out of 5 star rating and a price of about 67 dollars per bottle.

The Donum Estate Russian River Valley Pinot Noir

This Pinot Noir displays abundant and intense aromas of ripe black fruits, including cherry, plum and raspberry, in a complex and concentrated nose. Smooth and richly textured, the wine offers great depth of black cherry, berry and cola flavors with notes of mineral and spice on a bright and long-lasting finish.

» Get this wine on Wine.com

Ingredients

Servings:
1 pound
1 pound kobe sirloin tips
kobe sirloin tips
2 large
2 large russet potatoes
russet potatoes
1 pound
1 pound baby portobello mushrooms
baby portobello mushrooms
1 cup
1 cup white diced onion
white diced onion
2 Tbsps
2 Tbsps duck fat
duck fat
1 cup
1 cup red wine
red wine
1 quart
1 quart beef broth
beef broth
1 Tbsp
1 Tbsp cornstarch
cornstarch
some
some black sea salt and cracked pepper
black sea salt and cracked pepper
1 handful
1 handful rocket
rocket
1 pound kobe sirloin tips
1 pound
kobe sirloin tips
2 large russet potatoes
2 large
russet potatoes
1 pound baby portobello mushrooms
1 pound
baby portobello mushrooms
1 cup white diced onion
1 cup
white diced onion
2 Tbsps duck fat
2 Tbsps
duck fat
1 cup red wine
1 cup
red wine
1 quart beef broth
1 quart
beef broth
1 Tbsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp
cornstarch
some black sea salt and cracked pepper
some
black sea salt and cracked pepper
1 handful rocket
1 handful
rocket

Equipment

serrated knife
serrated knife
butter knife
butter knife
pastry brush
pastry brush
mandoline
mandoline
stove
stove
tongs
tongs
bowl
bowl
oven
oven
wok
wok
serrated knife
serrated knife
butter knife
butter knife
pastry brush
pastry brush
mandoline
mandoline
stove
stove
tongs
tongs
bowl
bowl
oven
oven
wok
wok


Instructions

I trim my two potatoes into the largest squarest bricks I can. Needless to say, this creates a good deal of waste; but my worms will love it. Setting my mandoline on its lowest setting, I run both blocks across the blade until Ive sliced several decks of cards. I know this looks like smooth applesauce butter, but it is really my pure, perfect duck fat harvested from a duck a roasted on Sunday, in honor of my new niece. Although the recipe called for clarified butter, I couldnt help but dig into this lusciousness; it was, metaphorically speaking, burning a hole in my fridge. Using a butter knife, I spread about a tablespoon of this fantastic fat along the top and sides (sliding in between the leaves and even shoving underneath) of my stacked, toppled, and loosely packed together tower of slender potato slices. I sprinkle generously with salt and pepper, and place into a 400 degree oven to roast for 40 minutes. I melt the remaining tablespoon of duck fat in my wok over medium high heat to sizzling Before I add my minced onion, which I let soften and translusce Before I add my mushrooms, which Ive scrubbed clean, and which I let brown Before I add my red wine, which I let simmer and reduce for a few minutes Before I add my beef stock, which I bring to a boil. And I let it boil, and boil, and boil for the entire 40 minutes that my potatoes are cooking, which reduces and releases all the stocks extraneous liquids into my kitchens atmosphere, while concentrating the flavors of beef, wine, and mushroom. Here I am at the 20 minute mark; one can see how far down the wok the sauce has simmered about 50%. I was willing to pay $30 for Wagyu steaks tonight, but Savenors only had two cuts available: ribeyes, which were upwards of $50/lb (too rich for my purse), and sirloin tips for a very reasonable $14.99/lb which is less then what I pay for dry-aged steaks from Whole Foods. I usually equate sirloin tips with Golden Corral, though, and Ive never really worked with them plus, I certainly didnt know how to work with them on my crappy electric stovetop. Most recipes I immediately encountered suggested marinating sirloin tips in burgandy, but I simply couldnt imagine adulterating the fragile flavor perfection of such an excellent quality cow by drowning it in wine. But the beauty of Waygu is its tenderness their Japanese progenitors are massaged by hand, and nipple-fed beer, for crying out loud, and our American cross-breeds are better-eating vegans than Gwenyth See how marbled? These threads of fat will turn to aspic under the searing heat, leaving tender sinews the beg to burst under the pressure of piercing, tearing canines. I need to buy some grapeseed oil, which is what I prefer when searing meat. Olive oil smokes to quickly, and its flavor does heat well, IMHO. So I used a 60/40-ish hand blend of vegetable oil and sesame oil providing a high-smoking point and a gentle, toasty flavor. Ive cut my sirloin tips into large cubes, and I now throw those big ol bites into my sizzling oil. Action Shot! (Ok, crappy shot just work with me here) Using tongs, and a little patience, I cook each cube for about 1 minute on each side: thats top, bottom, and each of its four (or so) sides. With the heat set to high, this imparts a quick caramelization on each surface, trapping in the sweet sweet juices, encrusting the edges with crisp flavor, and evenly cooking the insides to leave a cool, pink, supple center. Its now 40 minutes, and my mushroom wine stock has reduced to a rich, thick jus. Using my smallest bowl, I scoop about a tablespoon of cornstarch out of the bin, and mix it using a pastry brush to smoothen it with a few tablespoons of my hot gravy stock. I dribble and blend this thickening mixture into my sauce, setting the heat on low and stirring well. This will tun my thin, savory jus into a thick, rich gravy. At the final moment, I pull my potatoes out of the oven. They are crisp at the edges, and sizzling underneath. Craftily employing a serrated knife, I saw the crunchy base off the bottom, and very carefully move halves of the stack to two waiting plates. Clayton and I oohed and ahhed and melted and purred and raised our hands heavenward before, during, and after each bite: the steak bites were tender, pink, and Lucy-in-the-sky-with-diamonds juicy, the mushroom sauce a mink blanket of rich delight rubbed across the surface of my tongue, and the potatoes were crisp-edged, dripped in meaty fat, with supple, warm centers. Topped with peppery rocket drizzled with the finest of EVOOs, this $30 dinner was worth millions to my weeknight well-being.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $19.69
Ingredient
1 pound kobe sirloin tips
2 larges russet potatoes
1 pound baby portobello mushrooms
1 cup white diced onion
2 tablespoons duck fat
1 cup red wine
1 quart beef broth
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 handful rocket
Price
$7.05
$0.98
$5.03
$0.35
$0.58
$3.13
$2.25
$0.03
$0.29
$19.69

Nutritional Information

Quickview
1927 Calories
138g Protein
55g Total Fat
180g Carbs
71% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
1927k
96%

Fat
55g
85%

  Saturated Fat
27g
174%

Carbohydrates
180g
60%

  Sugar
24g
27%

Cholesterol
353mg
118%

Sodium
4073mg
177%

Alcohol
25g
141%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
138g
276%

Vitamin B3
69mg
349%

Vitamin B6
6mg
319%

Selenium
211µg
302%

Potassium
7403mg
212%

Phosphorus
2061mg
206%

Zinc
24mg
160%

Copper
2mg
125%

Manganese
2mg
111%

Vitamin B5
10mg
109%

Vitamin B12
6µg
105%

Iron
18mg
103%

Vitamin B2
1mg
97%

Folate
360µg
90%

Magnesium
347mg
87%

Vitamin B1
1mg
84%

Fiber
18g
74%

Vitamin C
56mg
69%

Vitamin K
42µg
41%

Calcium
381mg
38%

Vitamin D
1µg
12%

Vitamin E
1mg
12%

Vitamin A
489IU
10%

covered percent of daily need

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