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Homemade Hard Taco Night with Carnitas and Pinto Beans

 
One serving costs about $8.29 One serving costs about $8.29 One serving costs about $8.29

$8.29 per serving

2 people like this recipe

2 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

2 gluten-free,healthy,gluten free lunch,main course,main dish,dinner mexican
spoonacular Score:93%

Spoonacular Score: 93%

 

The recipe Homemade Hard Taco Night with Carnitas and Pinto Beans is ready in around 45 minutes and is definitely an amazing gluten free option for lovers of Mexican food. This recipe makes 2 servings with 1528 calories, 119g of protein, and 68g of fat each. For $7.8 per serving, this recipe covers 70% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. Only a few people really liked this main course. 2 people have tried and liked this recipe. A mixture of oil, sea salt, onion, and a handful of other ingredients are all it takes to make this recipe so yummy. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 93%. This score is outstanding. Try Taco Salad With Pinto Beans and Avocado, Vegetarian Refried Beans for Taco Night, and Taco Night with Homemade Corn Tortillas for similar recipes.

Mexican works really well with Riesling, Pinot Noir, and Sparkling rosé. Acidic white wines like riesling or low-tannin reds like pinot noir can work well with Mexican dishes. Sparkling rosé is a safe pairing too. You could try Poet's Leap Riesling. Reviewers quite like it with a 4 out of 5 star rating and a price of about 20 dollars per bottle.

Poet's Leap Riesling

Key lime and fresh citrus peel aromas give way to vivid layers of white peach and stone fruit flavors accented by a pleasant touch of minerality. Delicious natural acidity and a hint of residual sugar provide a balanced, vibrant mouth-feel and lengthy finish.

» Get this wine on Wine.com

Ingredients

Servings:
2
2  avocados
avocados
2
2  boneless pork shoulder
boneless pork shoulder
2 cups
2 cups chicken stock
chicken stock
1 bunch
1 bunch cilantro
cilantro
12
12  corn tortillas
corn tortillas
some
some EVOO
EVOO
0.44 cloves
0.44 cloves garlic
garlic
1 small
1 small jalapeno
jalapeno
1
1  lime
lime
some
some shredded monterey jack cheese
shredded monterey jack cheese
1
1  navel orange
navel orange
some
some oil
oil
2 cups
2 cups diced red onion
diced red onion
some
some black sea salt
black sea salt
some
some fresh tomatoes
fresh tomatoes
2  avocados
2
avocados
2  boneless pork shoulder
2
boneless pork shoulder
2 cups chicken stock
2 cups
chicken stock
1 bunch cilantro
1 bunch
cilantro
12  corn tortillas
12
corn tortillas
some EVOO
some
EVOO
0.44 cloves garlic
0.44 cloves
garlic
1 small jalapeno
1 small
jalapeno
1  lime
1
lime
some shredded monterey jack cheese
some
shredded monterey jack cheese
1  navel orange
1
navel orange
some oil
some
oil
2 cups diced red onion
2 cups
diced red onion
some black sea salt
some
black sea salt
some fresh tomatoes
some
fresh tomatoes

Equipment

tongs
tongs
bowl
bowl
frying pan
frying pan
pot
pot
tongs
tongs
bowl
bowl
frying pan
frying pan
pot
pot


Instructions

  1. Into a hot pan sizzling with a glug or two of EVOO I sear my pork, using tongs to turn each piece over until each side of each cube is nicely browned.
  2. I add my onion, garlic, and a healthy handful of chopped cilantro (about a cup) to my sizzling pork pieces, and toss well. I cook this until the onion softens about 4 minutes.
  3. Then I add my orange juice and the juice from 12 a lime, which I stir in well. I bring them just to a boil before I add my chicken stock, which covers about 3/4 of my meat. I set the heat to medium, and bring this to a slow simmer to braise for the next three hours.
  4. I fried taco shells by adding a few inches of vegetable oil to a deep fry pan and set it to high heat. When sizzling, using tongs, I floated 1/2 of a 10 corn tortilla on the surface of the blistering oil about 5 seconds did the trick, or until it set.
  5. Moving quickly but carefully, I flipped the tortilla over, rolling it in the oil, releasing the tongs from one edge and immediately catching the other edge in their grip.
  6. Holding the other edge under the hot oil, I fried it until crunchy, then dipped the center fold into the pot to crisp it up last. Be careful to pour all the oil out when lifting your shells from the fryer. I sprinkled them with sea salt while hot
  7. I put my small deep pan, with a few glugs of EVOO, over the heat for about 10 minutes before adding 1/2 a cup of my diced onion and some minced garlic. I cook this until just softened and fragrant. Then I add about a teaspoon of black pepper, a healthy sprinkling of cumin, and a dash of sea salt. Finally, I add my can of pinto beans, liquid and all. I cover and bring to a simmer, heating all the beans through.
  8. I peel, mash and add fresh cilantro, a dash of minced garlic, a squeeze of lemon juice, sea salt, cracked black pepper, 1/2 of the rest of my diced red onion, and ground cumin to my avocados to make gaucamole.
  9. In another bowl, Ive mixed my diced tomatoes, some diced red onion, minced garlic, fresh cilantro, the juice of 1/2 a lime, a glug of EVOO, and a dash of white vinegar together (along with some diced jalapeno, if you want heat), to make a quick fresh delicious pico de gallo.
  10. My carnitas are perfect: their edges are caramelized and crunchy, their interiors tender and falling apart at the tiniest touch of a fork. I scoop about 4 tablespoons of that uber-rich pork/citrus/chicken/EVOOfat up and dump it into my beans for flavor.
  11. After about 15 minutes, and some squishing of beans with my fork, they are thick and syrupy and ready for another shot of pepper and some fresh cilantro. If you like things hot, some jalapeno could be added to this mix, or a dash or two of hot pepper oil.
  12. Finally, as the sun sets in the west, my tacos are ready to be eaten. We each make our own: mine has an underlayer of soft shredded cheese, a heaping helping of tender, citrus-spiced pork, some pico, some guacamole, some sour cream and a sprinkling of cilantro on top, along with some cheese and cream on my beans, too.
  13. Each delightful bite is a mouthful of fresh, heady flavors, bright with herbs and orange/lime, deep with cumin and pepper spice. The cooling avocado and tangy tomatoes compliment the richness of the stewed meat, and the crispy, salty corn shells hold their shape, perfectly encasing each fantastic nibble.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $8.43
Ingredient
2 avocados
2 boneless pork shoulder
2 cups chicken stock
1 bunch cilantro
12 corn tortillas
some EVOO
4 cloves garlic
1 small jalapeno
1 lime
some shredded monterey jack cheese
1 navel orange
some oil
2 cups diced red onion
some fresh tomatoes
Price
$3.00
$7.05
$1.54
$0.26
$1.11
$0.33
$0.27
$0.06
$0.25
$0.02
$0.47
$0.08
$1.07
$1.35
$16.87

Tips

Health Tips

  • Be conscious of your choice of cooking oils. Some studies have shown that vegetable oils like safflower oil, sunflower oil, and canola oil might actually contribute to heart disease. Olive oil is a good alternative for low temperature cooking, while coconut oil is a recent favorite for high temperature cooking. Do your research!

  • Before you pass up garlic because you don't want the bad breath that comes with it, keep in mind that the compounds that cause garlic breath also offer a lot of health benefits. Garlic has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and antiviral properties. If you really want to get the most health benefits out of your garlic, choose Spanish garlic, which contains the most allicin (one of garlic's most beneficial compounds).

  • Although the body needs salt to survive, most of us get too much. The problem with consuming too much salt (what chemists call "sodium chloride") is actually the sodium part, which is why people concerned about high blood pressure go on low-sodium diets. If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet, you can try salt substitutes like potassium chloride or try to make do with less salt by using more black pepper, herbs, and spices.

  • Some bouillon/stock products contain gluten, some don't. If you are following a gluten-free diet, always read product labels carefully.

  • get more health tips

Price Tips

  • Avocados are one of the "clean fifteen", so you don't have to buy them organic if you don't want to spend the extra dough.

  • Sea salt can add a unique texture or provide bursts of salty goodness, but ONLY when it isn't being dissolved. So if you have expensive sea salt, save it for sprinkling on salads or dark chocolate cookies, don't try to use it in your pasta sauce or soup. Once sea salt dissolves, the flavor is indistinguishable from table salt from the shaker (after all, they are chemically the same thing, sodium chloride).

Cooking Tips

  • The average fresh lime contains 2 tablespoons of lime juice (just in case you are substituting bottled lime juice).

  • To keep your eyes from stinging and watering while cutting onions, trying popping the onion in the freezer for 15 minutes before you plan to start cooking. Chilling the onion slows the release of the enzyme responsible for teary eyes.

  • Just a head's up: tomatoes shouldn't be refrigerated! They will lose their flavor and probably get mushy too. For more on selecting and storing tomatoes and other vegetables, check out the academy.

  • You should not store your onions with your potatoes because the gases they emit will make each other spoil faster. For more information about selecting and storing onions, check out this lesson about onions in the academy.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • According to the Non-GMO Project, about 90% of the canola oil in the United States is made from genetically modified rapeseed, so if this issue is important to you be sure to buy certified organic or certified GMO-free canola oil!

  • Tomatoes, especially cherry tomatoes, should be bought organic when possible. Moreover, buying tomatoes from your local farmers' market when they are in season is going to make your dish much, much tastier, not to mention more eco-friendly. In fact, we recommend using canned — or better yet, jarred?tomato products when tomatoes aren't in season instead of buying imported or greenhouse-grown tomatoes.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
1586 Calories
120g Protein
67g Total Fat
132g Carbs
100% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
1586
79%

Fat
67g
104%

  Saturated Fat
12g
80%

Carbohydrates
132g
44%

  Sugar
24g
28%

Cholesterol
266mg
89%

Sodium
878mg
38%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
120g
242%

Vitamin B3
52mg
264%

Vitamin B6
4mg
231%

Vitamin B1
3mg
224%

Selenium
128µg
184%

Phosphorus
1772mg
177%

Vitamin B2
2mg
159%

Vitamin C
119mg
145%

Fiber
31g
124%

Potassium
4016mg
115%

Zinc
12mg
86%

Magnesium
341mg
85%

Vitamin B5
7mg
79%

Vitamin K
81µg
77%

Manganese
1mg
71%

Folate
271µg
68%

Copper
1mg
66%

Vitamin B12
3µg
62%

Vitamin E
8mg
59%

Iron
8mg
49%

Vitamin A
2349IU
47%

Calcium
305mg
31%

covered percent of daily need

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