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Farm Fresh Vegetable Stew

 
This recipe belongs to the top 10% of the healthiest recipes.healthy
This recipe is vegetarian.vegetarian
This recipe is vegan.vegan
This recipe can be made gluten free by choosing gluten-free versions of basic ingredients commonly found in supermarkets or online.gluten-free
This recipe can be made completely dairy-free.dairy-free
 
One serving costs about $1.47

$1.47 per serving

3 people like this recipe

3 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

7 fall,winter,vegetarian,vegan,gluten-free,dairy-free,healthy,gluten free,dairy free,lacto ovo vegetarian,vegan lunch,soup,main course,main dish,dinner
spoonacular Score:85%

Spoonacular Score: 85%

 

If you have around around 45 minutes to spend in the kitchen, Farm Fresh Vegetable Stew might be a great gluten free, dairy free, lacto ovo vegetarian, and vegan recipe to try. This main course has 264 calories, 13g of protein, and 5g of fat per serving. This recipe serves 7 and costs $1.47 per serving. It will be a hit at your Autumn event. Head to the store and pick up eggplant, kosher salt, green beans, and a few other things to make it today. 3 people found this recipe to be flavorful and satisfying. It is brought to you by Foodista. With a spoonacular score of 85%, this dish is excellent. Similar recipes include Farm Fresh Quiche, Farm Fresh Portobella Burgers, and Farm Fresh Turkey Chili.

Cabernet Sauvignon, Chablis, and Malbec are great choices for Vegetable Stew. Full-bodied red wines like malbec and cabernet sauvignon are the perfect accompaniment for beef stew. Fish stew probably calls for a white wine, such as chablis. One wine you could try is Cakebread Vine Hill Ranch Cabernet Sauvignon. It has 4.9 out of 5 stars and a bottle costs about 95 dollars.

Cakebread Vine Hill Ranch Cabernet Sauvignon

The 2001 Vine Hill Cabernet Sauvignon displays the deep, rich fruit and superb tannin structure characteristic of this magnificent Oakville vineyard. The aroma is classic Napa Valley: ripe, dusty blackberry, black plum and black currant fruit laced with a hint of briary spice and a whiff of sweet, toasty oak. At first taste, the wine reveals a big, thick, harmonious texture followed by waves of deep, concentrated black fruit that expand on the palate and take on a spicy, licorice-like tone in the remarkably lengthy finish. Truly "hedonistic," but with a splendid balance of supple tannins and bright underlying acidity, this immensely generous Cabernet is hard to resist now, but will develop and provide pleasure for another decade.

» Get this wine on Wine.com

Ingredients

Servings:
0.13 cups
0.13 cups extra virgin olive oil
extra virgin olive oil
10 cloves
10 cloves garlic
garlic
3
3  diced onions
diced onions
3 cups
3 cups italian red green sweet diced peppers
italian red green sweet diced peppers
1.5 cups
1.5 cups diced carrots
diced carrots
0.5 cups
0.5 cups celery
celery
2 cups
2 cups diced salted eggplant
diced salted eggplant
0.5 cups
0.5 cups green beans
green beans
2
2  diced yellow squash
diced yellow squash
1
1  diced zucchini
diced zucchini
4
4  diced tomatoes
diced tomatoes
1 tsp
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
fresh thyme leaves
1 tsp
1 tsp cumin
cumin
4 tsps
4 tsps kosher salt
kosher salt
1 tsp
1 tsp dried oregano
dried oregano
2 cans
2 cans canned kidney beans
canned kidney beans
8 oz
8 oz cooked brown lentils
cooked brown lentils
0.13 cups extra virgin olive oil
0.13 cups
extra virgin olive oil
10 cloves garlic
10 cloves
garlic
3  diced onions
3
diced onions
3 cups italian red green sweet diced peppers
3 cups
italian red green sweet diced peppers
1.5 cups diced carrots
1.5 cups
diced carrots
0.5 cups celery
0.5 cups
celery
2 cups diced salted eggplant
2 cups
diced salted eggplant
0.5 cups green beans
0.5 cups
green beans
2  diced yellow squash
2
diced yellow squash
1  diced zucchini
1
diced zucchini
4  diced tomatoes
4
diced tomatoes
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
1 tsp
fresh thyme leaves
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp
cumin
4 tsps kosher salt
4 tsps
kosher salt
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp
dried oregano
2 cans canned kidney beans
2 cans
canned kidney beans
8 oz cooked brown lentils
8 oz
cooked brown lentils

Equipment

paper towels
paper towels
pot
pot
peeler
peeler
paper towels
paper towels
pot
pot
peeler
peeler


Instructions

Advanced Prep work Cut an eggplant into rounds. Lay the eggplant on a paper towel and sprinkle with kosher salt. After about 15 minutes, dice and add to the stew. Remove the skins from the tomato. If you have a soft skin peeler, you can use it to remove the skins. Otherwise, you can blanch the tomatoes in boiling water, scoring the tops first, and then removing the skins. Cook the lentils in boiling water for 8 minutes, drain and run under cool water. Cooking Instructions In a large stock pot, heat olive oil on a medium heat. Saute the garlic for just a minute and add the onions. Season with 2 teaspoons of kosher salt and cook for about 10 minutes. Begin adding the other vegetables gradually, starting with the peppers, carrots and squash. When all the vegetables are in the stew, add the thyme, cumin, salt and oregano. Let the vegetables simmer until tender as a stock begins to form. Mix in the lentils and kidney beans. Simmer for as long as you have, up to an hour and a half.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $1.53
Ingredient
⅛ cups extra virgin olive oil
10 cloves garlic
3 diced onions
3 cups italian red green sweet diced peppers
1.5 cups diced carrots
½ cups celery
2 cups diced salted eggplant
½ cups green beans
2 diced yellow squash
1 diced zucchini
4 diced tomatoes
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon cumin
4 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 cans canned kidney beans
8 ounces cooked brown lentils
Price
$0.32
$0.67
$0.73
$1.37
$0.34
$0.19
$0.54
$0.18
$1.73
$0.56
$1.85
$0.11
$0.13
$0.03
$0.10
$1.62
$0.24
$10.71

Tips

Health Tips

  • Lycopene, the chemical in tomatoes that makes them red (and healthy), is fat soluble. This means eating tomatoes with a fat — say, avocado or olive oil?improves the body's ability to absorb the lycopene. Don't hesitate to include some healthy fats in this dish to get the most health benefits from the tomatoes!

  • Before you pass up garlic because you don't want the bad breath that comes with it, keep in mind that the compounds that cause garlic breath also offer a lot of health benefits. Garlic has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and antiviral properties. If you really want to get the most health benefits out of your garlic, choose Spanish garlic, which contains the most allicin (one of garlic's most beneficial compounds).

Price Tips

  • Fresh herbs can be expensive, so don't let them go to waste. If you have any leftovers, you might be able to freeze them. The Kitchn recommends freezing hardy herbs like rosemary and thyme in olive oil, while Better Homes and Gardens suggests using freezer bags to freeze basil, chives, mint, and more.

Cooking Tips

  • When buying celery, make sure the stalks feel firm and the leaves look fresh. Store in your refrigerator's crisper for up to two weeks.

  • To keep your eyes from stinging and watering while cutting onions, trying popping the onion in the freezer for 15 minutes before you plan to start cooking. Chilling the onion slows the release of the enzyme responsible for teary eyes.

  • Extra-virgin olive oil is the least refined type of olive oil and therefore contains more of the beneficial compounds that get lost during processing. However, its minimal processing could also mean it has a lower smoke point than other olive oils. Once an oil starts to smoke, it begins to break down, producing a bad flavor and potentially harmful compounds. Unfortunately, the smoke point of an oil depends on so many factors that it is hard to say what the smoke point of an oil really is. For extra-virgin olive oil, it could be anywhere between 200-400 degrees Fahrenheit. Most people recommend using extra-virgin olive oil to add flavor to a finished dish or in cold dishes to be on the safe side. More refined olive oils, canola oil, coconut oil, and clarified butter/ghee are better options for high temperature cooking.

  • Carrots can be stored in the fridge for 2 to 3 weeks. The starch in the carrots will turn to sugar over time, but this is not a problem, they'll just taste sweeter. The academy lesson about carrots contains more useful information.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • According to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), celery is one of the worst vegetables in term of pesticide residue. If you're trying to reduce pesticide residue in your diet, be sure to buy organic celery.

  • Tomatoes, especially cherry tomatoes, should be bought organic when possible. Moreover, buying tomatoes from your local farmers' market when they are in season is going to make your dish much, much tastier, not to mention more eco-friendly. In fact, we recommend using canned — or better yet, jarred?tomato products when tomatoes aren't in season instead of buying imported or greenhouse-grown tomatoes.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
263 Calories
13g Protein
5g Total Fat
45g Carbs
56% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
263
13%

Fat
5g
8%

  Saturated Fat
0.81g
5%

Carbohydrates
45g
15%

  Sugar
12g
14%

Cholesterol
0.0mg
0%

Sodium
1698mg
74%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
13g
27%

Vitamin A
5689IU
114%

Vitamin C
85mg
104%

Fiber
15g
61%

Manganese
1mg
56%

Folate
157µg
39%

Vitamin B6
0.72mg
36%

Potassium
1227mg
35%

Phosphorus
299mg
30%

Vitamin K
31µg
30%

Magnesium
96mg
24%

Vitamin B1
0.36mg
24%

Copper
0.48mg
24%

Iron
4mg
23%

Vitamin B2
0.31mg
18%

Vitamin B3
2mg
14%

Zinc
1mg
13%

Calcium
114mg
11%

Vitamin E
1mg
11%

Vitamin B5
0.91mg
9%

Selenium
3µg
5%

covered percent of daily need

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