Sign In Chef

OR

No account yet? Sign up.

Forgot your password?

×

Our Disclaimer (The serious stuff)

By using our free meal planner (and the rest of spoonacular.com) you have to agree that you and only you are responsible for anything that happens to you because of something you have read on this site or have bought/cooked/eaten because of this site. After all, the only person who controls what you put in your mouth is you, right?

Spoonacular is a recipe search engine that sources recipes from across the web. We do our best to find recipes suitable for many diets — whether vegetarian, vegan, gluten free, dairy free, etc. — but we cannot guarantee that a recipe's ingredients are safe for your diet. Always read ingredient lists from the original source (follow the link from the "Instructions" field) in case an ingredient has been incorrectly extracted from the original source or has been labeled incorrectly in any way. Moreover, it is important that you always read the labels on every product you buy to see if the product could cause an allergic reaction or if it conflicts with your personal or religious beliefs. If you are still not sure after reading the label, contact the manufacturer.

We also attempt to estimate the cost and calculate the nutritional information for the recipes found on our site. Again, we cannot guarantee the accuracy of this information. Additionally, our nutrition visualizer that suggests that you limit sodium, sugar, etc., and get enough protein, vitamins, and minerals is not intended as medical advice. Similarly, our health tips are based on articles we have read from various sources across the web, and are not based on any medical training. The team behind spoonacular does not possess any medical qualifications and the information may be found to be incorrect or out of date based on future research. If you need help planning your diet or determining which foods (and recipes) are safe for you, contact a registered dietitian, allergist, or another medical professional.

Spoonacular is not responsible for any adverse effects or damages that occur because of your use of the website or any information it provides (e.g. after cooking/consuming a recipe on spoonacular.com or on any of the sites we link to, after reading information from articles or shared via social media, etc.)

×

Duck Breast with Redcurrant and Port Sauce

 
One serving costs about $7.74 One serving costs about $7.74 One serving costs about $7.74

$7.74 per serving

1 people like this recipe

1 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

4 gluten-free,gluten free lunch,main course,main dish,dinner
spoonacular Score:79%

Spoonacular Score: 79%

 

Need a gluten free and primal main course? Duck Breast with Redcurrant and Port Sauce could be an excellent recipe to try. One serving contains 491 calories, 49g of protein, and 15g of fat. For $7.37 per serving, this recipe covers 33% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. This recipe from Foodista has 1 fans. A mixture of tbsp of honey, oz. currants, tsp of port, and a handful of other ingredients are all it takes to make this recipe so yummy. To use up the port you could follow this main course with the Port Cobbler as a dessert. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes roughly 45 minutes. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 74%. This score is good. Similar recipes include Seared Duck Breast with Ruby Port Sauce, Seared Duck Breast with Cherries and Port Sauce, and Divine Boneless Duck Breast With Port Wine Sauce.

Ingredients

Servings:
some
some black bell pepper
black bell pepper
0.71 oz
0.71 oz unsalted butter
unsalted butter
1.25 cups
1.25 cups chicken stock
chicken stock
7.06 oz
7.06 oz red currants
red currants
4
4  duck breasts
duck breasts
2
2  honey
honey
4
4  port
port
some
some salt and pepper
salt and pepper
some
some sea-salt
sea-salt
1
1  shallot
shallot
2
2  fresh thyme leaves
fresh thyme leaves
some black bell pepper
some
black bell pepper
0.71 oz unsalted butter
0.71 oz
unsalted butter
1.25 cups chicken stock
1.25 cups
chicken stock
7.06 oz red currants
7.06 oz
red currants
4  duck breasts
4
duck breasts
2  honey
2
honey
4  port
4
port
some salt and pepper
some
salt and pepper
some sea-salt
some
sea-salt
1  shallot
1
shallot
2  fresh thyme leaves
2
fresh thyme leaves

Equipment

frying pan
frying pan
stove
stove
whisk
whisk
oven
oven
frying pan
frying pan
stove
stove
whisk
whisk
oven
oven


Instructions

  1. For the Duck
  2. 1.Put the oven on to heat it to 200C/400F. While the oven is heating, start the cooking process in a heavy bottomed frying pan/skillet.
  3. 2.Sprinkle the salt and pepper on the skin side of the duck and rub it in.
  4. 3.Place your pan on the hob/stove top. Put the duck breasts in the cold pan, skin side down. Turn on the heat to medium high and allow the duck to cook, leave it alone while this happens. If it starts to smoke too much, turn down the heat a little.
  5. 4.Once you can see that the duck has cooked about a little more than half way by looking at the side of it to see the colour change, it should be transferred to the oven. This should take about 10 to 15 minutes, but of course it depends on the thickness of your duck and the intensity of the heat you use to cook it. You can do this in your pan if it has a metal handle, or you can transfer the duck to a roasting tray if your pan has a plastic or other unsuitable handle which wont withstand the heat of the oven. I do the latter. If you are planning to do this too, heat the roasting tray in the oven beforehand. The easiest way to do this is to place it in there whilst you wait for the oven to reach temperature. The duck should be placed in the oven skin side down.
  6. 5.Once in the oven, cook it for a further 7 to 10 minutes.
  7. 6.Remove and allow to rest for a further 7 minutes before slicing it.
  8. For the Redcurrant and Port Sauce
  9. 1.Place half the butter in a pan and allow it to melt. Then add the shallots and cook them until softened on a medium high heat.
  10. 2.Add the thyme, chicken stock, port, honey and a little salt and pepper. Add about of the red currants, keeping the rest back to add at the end of cooking.
  11. 3.Turn up the heat to reduce the sauce until it is about 1/3 of its original volume.
  12. 4.Turn down the heat, add the rest of the butter and whisk through until it is melted. Add the remaining berries, check for seasoning and serve poured over the duck.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $7.74
Ingredient
some black bell pepper
20 grs unsalted butter
300 milliliters chicken stock
200 grs red currants
4 duck breasts
2 honey
4 port
1 shallot
2 fresh thyme leaves
Price
$1.50
$0.17
$0.96
$2.14
$25.83
$0.02
$0.08
$0.14
$0.11
$30.95

Tips

Health Tips

  • Although the body needs salt to survive, most of us get too much. The problem with consuming too much salt (what chemists call "sodium chloride") is actually the sodium part, which is why people concerned about high blood pressure go on low-sodium diets. If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet, you can try salt substitutes like potassium chloride or try to make do with less salt by using more black pepper, herbs, and spices.

  • If you are cooking with wine, be aware that the amount of alcohol that evaporates could be much less than you think. In fact, researchers found that anywhere between 4 and 49 percent of the alcohol in a dish might remain depending on the cooking method, length of cooking, etc. If you're concerned about the amount of alcohol you're consuming, keep an eye on how much wine is going into your dish!

  • Sea salt is not healthier than table salt, contrary to what you may have heard. Sea salt is usually 97.5% sodium chloride (same as regular old table salt) and the minerals accounting for the rest are too insignificant to make a difference?unless you plan on consuming sea salt by the pound, in which case the health benefits from the minerals will definitely be outweighed by the negative effects of all the sodium you are consuming!

  • Many people proclaim the health benefits of honey, saying it possesses antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Although the extent of its health benefits in humans remains unclear, studies have indeed confirmed that honey can help with cold symptoms and even heal wounds and prevent infections. If you're looking to reap the potential health benefits, dark raw honey is likely the best option.

  • get more health tips

Price Tips

  • Fresh herbs can be expensive, so don't let them go to waste. If you have any leftovers, you might be able to freeze them. The Kitchn recommends freezing hardy herbs like rosemary and thyme in olive oil, while Better Homes and Gardens suggests using freezer bags to freeze basil, chives, mint, and more.

  • Dried fruit can be expensive, especially if you opt for organic. Your own dehydrator could be a great investment if you eat dried fruits regularly!

  • Most dairy products stay good well past their sell-by date. Instead of throwing out perfectly safe food that is just a few days or maybe even a week or two old, make sure the product smells fine, has a normal texture, and doesn't taste funny. Sniff testing isn't exactly rocket science and it can keep you from wasting food (and money).

  • Sea salt can add a unique texture or provide bursts of salty goodness, but ONLY when it isn't being dissolved. So if you have expensive sea salt, save it for sprinkling on salads or dark chocolate cookies, don't try to use it in your pasta sauce or soup. Once sea salt dissolves, the flavor is indistinguishable from table salt from the shaker (after all, they are chemically the same thing, sodium chloride).

  • get more price tips

Cooking Tips

  • Fresh herbs should be added toward the end of the cooking process — even at the very last minute?especially delicate herbs like cilantro, basil, and dill. Hardier herbs like bay leaves, rosemary, and thyme can be added earlier.

  • Don't have fresh herbs? Substitute dried herbs, but use about 1/3 less because dried herbs are more potent than fresh.

  • If you don't have shallots, you can try substituting leek, onion, or green onion along with a clove of garlic. The flavor won't be the same, but it should do in a pinch.

  • When buying wine for cooking, it is certainly not a bad idea to buy a wine you would enjoy drinking (some wine for the dish, some wine for the chef?) But if your favorite wines cost a small fortune, save them for drinking and purchase a cheaper?though still good quality!?wine for cooking. Just don't buy "cooking wine" with added salt, food coloring, etc.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • Buying local honey from beekeepers in your area not only supports your community but helps those beekeepers protect bees! LocalHarvest can help you locate some tasty honey produced near you.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
513k Calories
49g Protein
15g Total Fat
45g Carbs
47% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
513k
26%

Fat
15g
23%

  Saturated Fat
5g
36%

Carbohydrates
45g
15%

  Sugar
38g
43%

Cholesterol
187mg
62%

Sodium
667mg
29%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
49g
99%

Vitamin B12
29µg
490%

Vitamin C
112mg
137%

Vitamin B6
1mg
90%

Vitamin B1
1mg
70%

Iron
12mg
69%

Selenium
47µg
68%

Phosphorus
528mg
53%

Vitamin A
2640IU
53%

Vitamin B3
10mg
52%

Vitamin B2
0.88mg
52%

Copper
0.97mg
49%

Potassium
1314mg
38%

Magnesium
84mg
21%

Fiber
5g
21%

Vitamin B5
2mg
21%

Manganese
0.35mg
17%

Zinc
2mg
15%

Folate
59µg
15%

Vitamin E
1mg
9%

Calcium
63mg
6%

Vitamin K
5µg
6%

covered percent of daily need

Related Recipes