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By using our free meal planner (and the rest of spoonacular.com) you have to agree that you and only you are responsible for anything that happens to you because of something you have read on this site or have bought/cooked/eaten because of this site. After all, the only person who controls what you put in your mouth is you, right?

Spoonacular is a recipe search engine that sources recipes from across the web. We do our best to find recipes suitable for many diets — whether vegetarian, vegan, gluten free, dairy free, etc. — but we cannot guarantee that a recipe's ingredients are safe for your diet. Always read ingredient lists from the original source (follow the link from the "Instructions" field) in case an ingredient has been incorrectly extracted from the original source or has been labeled incorrectly in any way. Moreover, it is important that you always read the labels on every product you buy to see if the product could cause an allergic reaction or if it conflicts with your personal or religious beliefs. If you are still not sure after reading the label, contact the manufacturer.

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Codfish Salad

 
This recipe can be made gluten free by choosing gluten-free versions of basic ingredients commonly found in supermarkets or online.gluten-free
This recipe can be made completely dairy-free.dairy-free
This recipe is suitable for a pescetarian diet.pescetarian
 
One serving costs about $2.37

$2.37 per serving

1 people like this recipe

1 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

6 gluten-free,dairy-free,pescetarian,gluten free,dairy free,pescatarian salad
spoonacular Score:76%

Spoonacular Score: 76%

 

Codfish Salad might be just the main course you are searching for. One serving contains 335 calories, 51g of protein, and 12g of fat. For $2.0 per serving, this recipe covers 29% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. This recipe is liked by 1 foodies and cooks. Head to the store and pick up hard-boiled eggs, mazola cooking oil, onion, and a few other things to make it today. All things considered, we decided this recipe deserves a spoonacular score of 68%. This score is solid. Try Codfish Puppies, Caribbean Codfish, and Codfish With Cheddar & Tomatoes for similar recipes.

Cod on the menu? Try pairing with Pinot Grigio, Gruener Veltliner, and Pinot Noir. Fish is as diverse as wine, so it's hard to pick wines that go with every fish. A crisp white wine, such as a pinot grigio or Grüner Veltliner, will suit any delicately flavored white fish. Meaty, strongly flavored fish such as salmon and tuna can even handle a light red wine, such as a pinot noir. You could try Rabble Pinot Gris. Reviewers quite like it with a 4.9 out of 5 star rating and a price of about 20 dollars per bottle.

Rabble Pinot Gris

Alsatian-inspired with notes of lime, green apple, white flower and wetstone. Following the nose are flavors of Anjou pear, white nectarine andcitrus. The vibrant and crisp acidity balances out this medium bodied wineand carries it through the lingering finish.

» Get this wine on Wine.com

Ingredients

Servings:
some
some black bell pepper
black bell pepper
3 Tbsps
3 Tbsps cooking oil
cooking oil
1
1  garlic clove
garlic clove
0.25 cup
0.25 cup diced green peppers
diced green peppers
3
3  hard-boiled eggs
hard-boiled eggs
1
1  onion
onion
0.25 cup
0.25 cup diced red peppers
diced red peppers
1 pound
1 pound salted cod fish
salted cod fish
1
1  tomato
tomato
some black bell pepper
some
black bell pepper
3 Tbsps cooking oil
3 Tbsps
cooking oil
1  garlic clove
1
garlic clove
0.25 cup diced green peppers
0.25 cup
diced green peppers
3  hard-boiled eggs
3
hard-boiled eggs
1  onion
1
onion
0.25 cup diced red peppers
0.25 cup
diced red peppers
1 pound salted cod fish
1 pound
salted cod fish
1  tomato
1
tomato


Instructions

  1. Soak codfish in water to cover overnight. Change water twice. Scald in boiling water and drain. Strip fish in small pieces and set aside in dish. Slice garlic clove and brown in oil. Add onions and saute until just tender. Add peppers and tomatoes, saute a little more and mix contents with codfish and, if desired, diced eggs. Serve on a bed of leaf lettuce. Good with biscuits.

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $2.37
Ingredient
some black bell pepper
3 tablespoons cooking oil
1 garlic clove
¼ cups diced green peppers
3 hard-boiled eggs
1 onion
¼ cups diced red peppers
1 pound salted cod fish
1 tomato
Price
$2.24
$0.11
$0.07
$0.11
$0.82
$0.24
$0.19
$10.07
$0.36
$14.22

Tips

Health Tips

  • Lycopene, the chemical in tomatoes that makes them red (and healthy), is fat soluble. This means eating tomatoes with a fat — say, avocado or olive oil?improves the body's ability to absorb the lycopene. Don't hesitate to include some healthy fats in this dish to get the most health benefits from the tomatoes!

  • Before you pass up garlic because you don't want the bad breath that comes with it, keep in mind that the compounds that cause garlic breath also offer a lot of health benefits. Garlic has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and antiviral properties. If you really want to get the most health benefits out of your garlic, choose Spanish garlic, which contains the most allicin (one of garlic's most beneficial compounds).

  • Be conscious of your choice of cooking oils. Some studies have shown that vegetable oils like safflower oil, sunflower oil, and canola oil might actually contribute to heart disease. Olive oil is a good alternative for low temperature cooking, while coconut oil is a recent favorite for high temperature cooking. Do your research!

Cooking Tips

  • Here's a trick for peeling garlic quickly. Put the garlic clove on your cutting board. Take a knife with a thick blade and place the blade flat across the garlic clove (the clove should be closer to the handle than the middle of the blade). Whack down on the flat side of the blade with your free hand to smoosh the garlic a bit. Done correctly, the skin will peel right off.

  • You should not store your onions with your potatoes because the gases they emit will make each other spoil faster. For more information about selecting and storing onions, check out this lesson about onions in the academy.

  • To get perfect hard-boiled eggs, start by storing the eggs with the tip of the egg pointing down. This will help center the yolk. Once it is time to make the eggs, put the eggs in a pot with cold water and bring it to a boil. Once you have a rolling boil, remove the pot from the heat and cover with a lid. After 12 minutes, drain the pot and rinse the eggs in cold water. To peel, crack the egg shell on all sides and roll it with your hand to thoroughly break up the shell.

  • To keep your eyes from stinging and watering while cutting onions, trying popping the onion in the freezer for 15 minutes before you plan to start cooking. Chilling the onion slows the release of the enzyme responsible for teary eyes.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • Bell peppers are unfortunately on the "dirty dozen" list compiled by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). You might want to buy them organic when you can.

  • According to the Non-GMO Project, about 90% of the canola oil in the United States is made from genetically modified rapeseed, so if this issue is important to you be sure to buy certified organic or certified GMO-free canola oil!

  • Tomatoes, especially cherry tomatoes, should be bought organic when possible. Moreover, buying tomatoes from your local farmers' market when they are in season is going to make your dish much, much tastier, not to mention more eco-friendly. In fact, we recommend using canned — or better yet, jarred?tomato products when tomatoes aren't in season instead of buying imported or greenhouse-grown tomatoes.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
357k Calories
51g Protein
11g Total Fat
8g Carbs
36% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
357k
18%

Fat
11g
18%

  Saturated Fat
1g
11%

Carbohydrates
8g
3%

  Sugar
5g
6%

Cholesterol
208mg
69%

Sodium
5348mg
233%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
51g
104%

Selenium
119µg
171%

Vitamin C
115mg
139%

Vitamin B12
7µg
131%

Phosphorus
794mg
79%

Vitamin A
2956IU
59%

Vitamin B6
0.98mg
49%

Potassium
1392mg
40%

Vitamin E
5mg
34%

Vitamin B3
6mg
33%

Magnesium
117mg
29%

Vitamin D
3µg
24%

Vitamin B2
0.39mg
23%

Vitamin B5
1mg
19%

Vitamin B1
0.28mg
19%

Folate
74µg
19%

Iron
2mg
15%

Calcium
146mg
15%

Zinc
1mg
12%

Vitamin K
11µg
11%

Manganese
0.2mg
10%

Fiber
2g
9%

Copper
0.17mg
9%

covered percent of daily need

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