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Baked Eggs and Bacon Cream In Spinach Fettuccine Nests

 
One serving costs about $1.63

$1.63 per serving

4 people like this recipe

4 likes

This recipe is ready in 45 minutes

Ready in 45 minutes

3 lunch,main course,morning meal,brunch,main dish,breakfast,dinner
spoonacular Score:32%

Spoonacular Score: 32%

 

Baked Eggs and Bacon Cream In Spinach Fettuccine Nests might be just the main course you are searching for. This recipe serves 3 and costs $1.63 per serving. One serving contains 557 calories, 21g of protein, and 51g of fat. 4 people found this recipe to be tasty and satisfying. It is brought to you by Foodista. A mixture of scallions, butter, heavy cream, and a handful of other ingredients are all it takes to make this recipe so scrumptious. From preparation to the plate, this recipe takes around around 45 minutes. With a spoonacular score of 31%, this dish is not so super. Users who liked this recipe also liked Baked Eggs With Bacon And Spinach, Baked Eggs with Spinach Bacon and Avocado, and Fettuccine with Bacon and Eggs.

Sparkling Wine are my top picks for Baked Egg. Even if you aren't making mimosas, sparkling wine is great with eggs for two reasons. One, if you're eating eggs early in the day, sparkling wine has less alcohol. Secondly, it cleanses the palate, which is important since yolk is known to coat the palate. One wine you could try is Reginato Malbec rosé. It has 4.7 out of 5 stars and a bottle costs about 17 dollars.

Reginato Malbec Rose

Malbec seems an unlikely hero for a sparkling wine grape, but when you want your rosé to show some real color and character, then Malbec's your man. Crisp and dry with lovely strawberry, rhubarb flavors and aromas. Just a hint of tannin structure, floral spice, and an amazing elegant finish rounds out the mouth. It speaks of the rich Malbec grape, but never loses its light, refreshing nature. It will give you a good reason to drink sparkling wine with your main course!

» Get this wine on Wine.com

Ingredients

Servings:
3 slices
3 slices bacon
bacon
0.5 stick
0.5 stick butter
butter
0.25 lb
0.25 lb parmigiano reggiano
parmigiano reggiano
0.5 cups
0.5 cups heavy cream
heavy cream
2
2  fresh eggs
fresh eggs
2 large
2 large spinach fettuccine
spinach fettuccine
some
some salt and pepper
salt and pepper
some
some scallions
scallions
3 slices bacon
3 slices
bacon
0.5 stick butter
0.5 stick
butter
0.25 lb parmigiano reggiano
0.25 lb
parmigiano reggiano
0.5 cups heavy cream
0.5 cups
heavy cream
2  fresh eggs
2
fresh eggs
2 large spinach fettuccine
2 large
spinach fettuccine
some salt and pepper
some
salt and pepper
some scallions
some
scallions

Equipment

muffin tray
muffin tray
ramekin
ramekin
tongs
tongs
oven
oven
wok
wok
muffin tray
muffin tray
ramekin
ramekin
tongs
tongs
oven
oven
wok
wok


Instructions

I begin with my bacon (Ive never had bacon this fresh before, from an entirely organic source so close to home that my husband is literally feeding next seasons pork belly), which I chop and try out to nice crispy cubelets. Now the rest of the meal will take less than 25 minutes: 10 minutes to boil the pasta, make the sauce, and assemble the dish (and, if youre like me, some sub-urb biscuits), and 15 minutes to bake it (while you make a quick salad). So be ready. I melt my butter in my wok over high heat. I throw my pasta nests into the salted boiling water on the back burner. When my butter is melted and just begging to tan, I add my heavy cream and blend well. I bring this to a simmer for a moment. Then I add 3/4 of my cheese, which Ive shredded. (The rest I will thinly shave for a final garnish.) I blend this well, bringing it to a low simmer to thicken, until it forms a smooth sauce. I also add some salt and pepper. (Crushed red pepper flakes, nutmeg, paprika, maybe even a dash of curry powder would work nicely here, too.) Finally, I add 3/4 of my cooked bacon, and blend well with the sauce, until the flavors are beautifully infused. Its been 10 minutes, and my 11 minute pasta is just slightly undercooked (I know, cuz I bit off a snippet) perfect! Using tongs and a meshed spoon, I transfer my pasta to the waiting bacon cream, and toss well. I add a tablespoon, maybe, of the pasta water, too, just to keep the sauce wet enough to bake later. Using my tongs, I spin 1/2 of the pasta and sauce into each of two medium (10oz) ceramic ramekins, which Ive brushed down with melted butter. I sprinkle most of the rest of my bacon (reserving a few chunks for a final flourish) on top. The piece of resistance: a whole, cracked, raw egg, dropped into a wee basket I left in the middle of my pasta and sauce nests. I manage to keep the yolk whole only in one, but the other I rather hold together by virtue of a cleverly placed noodle and some dribbled sauce. I place these into a 350 oven to bake for 15 minutes, or until the whites have set, but the yolk is still glossy and runny. After coring the best bits out of a loaf of bread destined for nothing (since my husband purchased a fresher loaf of preferred pan this afternoon) with a properly sized wine-glass rim, I brushed each disk with melted butter, and layered them with some of my sprinkled cheese into 4 cups of a buttered muffin tin, and then I stuck them in my oven along with my pasta nests to brown. I consider these my sub-urb Wonderbread biscuits: quick, easy, and yummy, leaving fodder for crotons (or compost). I also threw together a quick salad of baby greens, sliced onion, strips of roasted red peppers, black olives, EVOO, and salt and pepper. Not that dinner needed these accoutrement my simmering, saucy noodle nests of runny yolk baked eggs, bac

Read the detailed instructions on Foodista.com – The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit

Price Breakdown

Cost per Serving: $1.63
Ingredient
3 slices bacon
½ sticks butter
¼ pounds parmigiano reggiano
½ cups heavy cream
2 fresh eggs
some scallions
Price
$0.85
$0.48
$2.39
$0.65
$0.48
$0.04
$4.89

Tips

Health Tips

  • If you can, choose grassfed butter for a better nutritional profile—more vitamins, a favorable omega 3/6 ratio, etc.

  • The great thing about parmesan cheese is that a little goes a long way, especially if you're buying the real deal.

  • Don't make the mistake of assuming turkey bacon is healthier than pork bacon. Read the labels and look for short ingredient lists (not too many artificial ingredients, preservatives, and other additives). If you're watching your sodium intake, pay attention to that too. It is also important to note that the American Institute for Cancer Research has stated the consumption of ANY processed meat could increase your risk of developing cancer. Although it is not yet clear what causes the increased cancer risk, it could be the preservatives or other chemicals commonly used during processing.

Price Tips

  • Most dairy products stay good well past their sell-by date. Instead of throwing out perfectly safe food that is just a few days or maybe even a week or two old, make sure the product smells fine, has a normal texture, and doesn't taste funny. Sniff testing isn't exactly rocket science and it can keep you from wasting food (and money).

Cooking Tips

  • If you have too much bacon (is this even possible?) you can freeze individual slices by laying them between sheets of wax paper. Even better, you can put them on a single sheet of wax paper and roll the paper in such a way that you can just unroll it later and remove however many slices you want.

  • Surprising tip: you will end up with better bacon if you add water to the skillet when cooking it on the stovetop. For large amounts of bacon, you can also prepare bacon in the oven.

  • Butter's incredible flavor has made it an extremely popular cooking fat, but it is important to know that butter has the lowest smoke point of almost any cooking fat. This means butter literally starts to smoke at a lower temperature than most other fats between 250-350 degrees Fahrenheit. So while butter is great for cooking at lower temperatures, you should probably use canola oil, coconut oil, or another oil with a higher smoke point for frying and other high temperature cooking.

  • If parmesan plays a big role in the flavor of your dish (or if you're a serious foodie or serious about avoiding additivies) it might be worth your time to track down "true" parmesan, Parmigiano Reggiano.

  • get more cooking tips

Green Tips

  • Parmesan cheese is traditionally made using rennet, an animal-derived enzyme. For this reason, true parmesan cheese is not suitable for vegetarians. You might be able to find a vegetarian hard cheese to substitute.

Disclaimer

Nutritional Information

Quickview
556 Calories
21g Protein
51g Total Fat
3g Carbs
4% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
556
28%

Fat
51g
79%

  Saturated Fat
28g
180%

Carbohydrates
3g
1%

  Sugar
0.53g
1%

Cholesterol
244mg
82%

Sodium
1007mg
44%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
21g
42%

Calcium
497mg
50%

Phosphorus
383mg
38%

Selenium
22µg
33%

Vitamin A
1535IU
31%

Vitamin B2
0.33mg
19%

Vitamin B12
0.93µg
16%

Zinc
1mg
12%

Vitamin D
1µg
10%

Vitamin E
1mg
9%

Vitamin B5
0.87mg
9%

Vitamin B6
0.16mg
8%

Vitamin K
7µg
7%

Magnesium
26mg
7%

Vitamin B1
0.1mg
7%

Iron
0.97mg
5%

Vitamin B3
1mg
5%

Folate
20µg
5%

Potassium
160mg
5%

Copper
0.05mg
2%

Manganese
0.03mg
1%

covered percent of daily need

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